World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group

Loading...

E

ste paper relata os progressos recentes feitos pelo Brasil no sentido de consolidar a democracia, controlar a inflação e retomar o crescimento econômico. Com a objetividade possivel, levando em conta a participação dos autores nos acontecimentos, o relato busca reconhecer a importância e os limites da lideranca politica do país nesse processo, destacando os papéis do presidente da Republica, dos partidos politicos, do Congresso e dos meios de comunicação. Referências ocasionais à experiência dos vizinhos Argentina, Chile e México servem para realçar as peculiaridades do Brasil no contexto da América Latina. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Former President of Brazil (1995–2002); currently president of the Instituto Fernando Henrique Cardoso (Sao Paulo, Brazil) Eduardo Graeff, Head of the State of Sao Paulo Liasion office in Brasilia

Montek Ahluwalia Edmar Bacha Dr. Boediono Lord John Browne Kemal Dervis¸ Alejandro Foxley Goh Chok Tong Han Duck-soo Danuta Hübner Carin Jämtin Pedro-Pablo Kuczynski Danny Leipziger, Vice Chair Trevor Manuel Mahmoud Mohieldin Ngozi N. Okonjo-Iweala Robert Rubin Robert Solow Michael Spence, Chair Sir K. Dwight Venner Ernesto Zedillo Zhou Xiaochuan

The mandate of the Commission on Growth and Development is to gather the best understanding there is about the policies and strategies that underlie rapid economic growth and poverty reduction. The Commission’s audience is the leaders of developing countries. The Commission is supported by the governments of Australia, Sweden, the Netherlands, and United Kingdom, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and The World Bank Group.

Public Disclosure Authorized Public Disclosure Authorized



Commission on Growth and Development

Public Disclosure Authorized

his paper deals with Brazil’s recent progress in consolidating democracy, controlling inflation, and resuming economic growth. Written by participants in the process, and from their perspective, the paper seeks to identify the importance and the limits of political leadership, highlighting the roles of the presidency, political parties, Congress, and media. References to the experience of Argentina, Chile, and Mexico help to contrast what is specifically Brazil, and less Latin America.

Public Disclosure Authorized

T

57737 W O R K IN G PA P E R N O .38

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina Fernando Henrique Cardoso Eduardo Graeff

Bilingual/Bilíngüe www.growthcommission.org [email protected]

Cover_WP038.indd 1

11/24/2008 4:24:29 PM

WORKING PAPER NO. 38 

 

Political Leadership and Economic  Reform: The Brazilian Experience in   the Context of Latin America   

Liderança política e reformas  econômicas; a experiência brasileira   no contexto da América Latina  Fernando Henrique Cardoso   Eduardo Graeff 

Bilingual/Bilíngüe

© 2008 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank  On behalf of the Commission on Growth and Development   1818 H Street NW  Washington, DC 20433  Telephone: 202‐473‐1000  Internet:  www.worldbank.org    www.growthcommission.org  E‐mail:   [email protected]    [email protected]    All rights reserved    1 2 3 4 5 11 10 09 08    This working paper is a product of the Commission on Growth and Development, which is sponsored by  the following organizations:     Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID)  Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs  Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA)  U.K. Department of International Development (DFID)  The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation  The World Bank Group    The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the views of the  sponsoring organizations or the governments they represent.    The sponsoring organizations do not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The  boundaries, colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply  any judgment on the part of the sponsoring organizations concerning the legal status of any territory or  the endorsement or acceptance of such boundaries.    All queries on rights and licenses, including subsidiary rights, should be addressed to the   Office of the Publisher, The World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433, USA;   fax: 202‐522‐2422; e‐mail: [email protected]        Cover design: Naylor Design 

   

 

About the Series  The  Commission  on  Growth  and  Development  led  by  Nobel  Laureate  Mike  Spence was established in April 2006 as a response to two insights. First, poverty  cannot  be  reduced  in  isolation  from  economic  growth—an  observation  that  has  been  overlooked  in  the  thinking  and  strategies  of  many  practitioners.  Second,  there is growing awareness that knowledge about economic growth is much less  definitive than commonly thought. Consequently, the Commission’s mandate is  to  “take  stock  of  the  state  of  theoretical  and  empirical  knowledge  on  economic  growth with a view to drawing implications for policy for  the current and next  generation of policy makers.”  To  help  explore  the  state  of  knowledge,  the  Commission  invited  leading  academics  and  policy  makers  from  developing  and  industrialized  countries  to  explore  and  discuss  economic  issues  it  thought  relevant  for  growth  and  development,  including  controversial  ideas.  Thematic  papers  assessed  knowledge and highlighted ongoing debates in areas such as monetary and fiscal  policies,  climate  change,  and  equity  and  growth.  Additionally,  25  country  case  studies were commissioned to explore the dynamics of growth and change in the  context of specific countries.   Working papers in this series were presented and reviewed at Commission  workshops,  which  were  held  in  2007–08  in  Washington,  D.C.,  New  York  City,  and  New  Haven,  Connecticut.  Each  paper  benefited  from  comments  by  workshop  participants,  including  academics,  policy  makers,  development  practitioners,  representatives  of  bilateral  and  multilateral  institutions,  and  Commission members.  The  working  papers,  and  all  thematic  papers  and  case  studies  written  as  contributions  to  the  work  of  the  Commission,  were  made  possible  by  support  from the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID), the Dutch  Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Swedish International Development Cooperation  Agency  (SIDA),  the  U.K.  Department  of  International  Development  (DFID),  the  William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the World Bank Group.  The working paper series was produced under the general guidance of Mike  Spence and Danny Leipziger, Chair and Vice Chair of the Commission, and the  Commission’s  Secretariat,  which  is  based  in  the  Poverty  Reduction  and  Economic  Management  Network  of  the  World  Bank.  Papers  in  this  series  represent the independent view of the authors. 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

iii

   

 

Abstract  This  paper  deals  with  Brazilʹs  recent  progress  in  consolidating  democracy,  controlling inflation, and resuming economic growth. Written by participants in  the  process,  and  from  their  perspective,  the  paper  seeks  to  identify  the  importance  and  the  limits  of  political  leadership,  highlighting  the  roles  of  the  presidency,  political  parties,  Congress,  and  media.  References  to  the  experience  of Argentina, Chile, and Mexico help to contrast what is specifically Brazil, and  less Latin America.    

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

v

   

 

Contents  About the Series ............................................................................................................. iii Abstract .............................................................................................................................v Introduction ......................................................................................................................1 From Inflationary Crisis to the Consolidation of Stability .........................................3 The Drawbacks and Force of Democratic Reformism ..............................................12 Opportunity, Passion, and Perspective.......................................................................28 Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira   no contexto da América Latina..............................................................................33   

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

vii

     

 

 

Political Leadership   and Economic Reform:   The Brazilian Experience in   the Context of Latin America  Fernando Henrique Cardoso  Eduardo Graeff 1  

Introduction  Brazil grew 2.4 percent per year on average in the last 25 years—somewhat less  than Latin America, a good deal less than the world, far less than the emerging  countries  of  Asia  in  the  same  period,  and  indeed  far  less  than  Brazil  itself  in  previous decades. If anything stands out favorably in recent Brazilian experience,  it is not growth but stabilization and the successful opening of the economy. To  this  we  should  add  a  political  achievement:  democracy,  the  grand  cause  of  the  people  and  groups  who  have  succeeded  each  other  in  government  since  the  departure  of  the  military  in  1985.  Democracy,  rather  than  economic  stability  or  even  development—as  if  one  could  be  exchanged  for  the  other.  They  are  not  mutually  exclusive  goals,  of  course,  although  authoritarian  regimes  sometimes  display  faster  GDP  growth  rates.  For  Brazil,  as  for  other  Latin  American  countries,  all  three  presented  themselves  as  indivisible  challenges  at  the  start  of  the  1990s.   To  assume  that a  political  leader  in today’s  world  can  freely  determine  the  pace and direction of a country’s economy as he or she wishes is as questionable  as  believing  that  an  inspired  military  leader  alone  could  assure  victory  on  the  battlefield. In War and Peace Tolstoy mocks the princes and generals who behave  as  if  their  attitudes,  words,  and  resolutions  dictated  the  course  of  history.  His                                                          Fernando Henrique Cardoso is Former President of Brazil (1995–2002) and is currently president  of the Instituto Fernando Henrique Cardoso (Sao Paulo, Brazil) and honorary president of the Party  of the Brazilian Social Democracy (PSDB). He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Club of  Madrid (Madrid) and, in the United States, a member of the Clinton Global Initiative (New York,  NY), the Board of Directors of the Inter‐American Dialogue, the World Resources Institute, and the  Thomas J. Watson Jr. Institute for International Studies of Brown University (Providence, RI). He is  author  of  The  Accidental  President  of  Brazil—A  Memoir,  published  by  Public  Affairs  Books  (2006).  Eduardo  Graeff  is  a  head  of  the  State  of  Sao  Paulo  liaison  office  in  Brasilia.  He  was  chief  congressional  liaison  officer  and  General  Secretary  to  the  President  of  Brazil  under  Fernando  Henrique Cardoso’s administration (1995–2002).  1

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

1

  most acid irony is directed at the military theorists who claim to extract scientific  laws  from  the  infinite  multiplicity  of  events.  The  paradox,  as  he  sees  it,  is  this:  “The  higher  soldiers  or  statesmen  are  in  the  pyramid  of  authority,  the  farther  they  must  be  from  its  base,  which  consists  of  those  ordinary  men  and  women  whose lives are the actual stuff of history”.2 Spy satellites, smart bombs, guided  missiles,  and  other  technological  wonders  may  have  dispelled  the  “fog  of  war”  (albeit  only  to  some  extent).  Advances  in  information  technology  and  financial  engineering,  in  contrast,  have  shown  an  immense  capacity  to  increase  the  unpredictability of markets at certain times. Anyone who has been in charge of  the  foreign‐exchange  trading  desk  at  the  central  bank  of  a  peripheral  country  during a global crisis knows how hard it can be to keep calm and hold a steady  course in this kind of fog on a stormy sea.   Without  venturing  into  a  philosophical  discussion  of  the  limits  to  free  will  imposed by the course of nature and history, one must acknowledge the virtual  impossibility  of  distinguishing  between  what  was  due  to  the  initiatives  of  local  governments  and  what  was  imposed  from  outside  in  the  economic  changes  experienced by Brazil and its neighbors in the region. The second oil shock (1979)  and  the  U.S.  interest‐rate  shock  (1982)  plunged  almost  the  whole  of  Latin  America into a decade of stagnation and inflation, while the industrialized world  was  recycling  its  economy.  The  search  for  solutions  to  the  crisis  inevitably  responded  to  the  new  forms  of  operation  adopted  by  investors,  multinational  corporations,  governments  of  central  countries,  and  multilateral  economic  agencies.   This  does  not  mean,  as  some  market  economics  theorists  seem  to  suppose,  that  there  are  complete  recipes  for  development  that  will  open  the  doors  of  globalization  to  all  countries  if  they  are  prepared  to  “do  their  homework.”  Nor  that we Latin Americans are condemned forever to underdevelopment or merely  reflex development, as used to be supposed by vulgar dependency theorists and  as  some  people  still  believe.  Countries  experience  specific  historical  courses,  which are not limited to mechanically reproducing the global structural “model.”   A historical and structural analysis of this complex reality would start with  the rules according to which the global economy operates—the general, abstract  determinations, in Marxist jargon—and reconstitute how they were experienced,  adapted,  or  transformed  in  each  relatively  homogeneous  group  of  peripheral  countries. This would be the way to expose the dynamic relations between local  and  international  social  forces,  and  to  see  how  adaptations  and  innovations  in  the linkages between each country or group of countries and the global economy  produce different results, albeit subject to the same general conditioning factors.  The  framework  for  change  is  established  by  globalization  and  the  information  economy, but each country fits into it or defends itself from it in different ways.  The responses can be creative; some may be more advantageous than others and                                                          The quotation and the points about Tolstoy are from Isaiah Berlin, “The Hedgehog and the Fox,”  in Russian Thinkers, London, Penguin Books, 1979, pp. 22–80.  2

2

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  each  one  will  depend  both  on  circumstances  such  as  the  country’s  location,  population,  and  natural  resource  endowment,  and  on  political  decisions.  National societies have different degrees of economic and cultural development,  which facilitate better or worse alternatives for adapting to new circumstances.3  The  purpose  of  this  paper  is  more  modest.  It  is  limited  to  setting  out  our  particular  view  of  recent  efforts  to  consolidate  democracy  in  Brazil  while  controlling inflation and resuming economic growth. At the same time the paper  presents,  as  objectively  as  possible,  some  thoughts  on  the  limits  but  also  the  relevance of action by political leaders to set a course and circumvent obstacles to  that  process.  Here  and  there,  the  paper  refers  to  the  experiences  of  other  Latin  American countries, especially Argentina, Chile, and Mexico, not to offer a full‐ fledged  comparative  analysis  but  merely  to  note  contrasts  and  similarities  that  may shed light on the peculiarities of the Brazilian case and suggest themes for a  more wide‐ranging exchange of views.4 

From Inflationary Crisis to the   Consolidation of Stability   Democracy in the Expectations Race In  October  2006,  Luiz  Inácio  Lula  da  Silva  was  reelected  president  of  Brazil,  winning 60 percent of the valid votes cast in  the  runoff ballot,  after  leading  the  first round with 49 percent, 10 points ahead of the runner‐up. Reelection was the  crowning  achievement  for  a  politician  with  extraordinary  talent  as  a  mass  communicator  at  the  service  of  a  democratic  symbol—a  migrant  from  the  Northeast  who  became  a  union  leader,  the  founder  of  a  political  party,  and  President of the Republic. To voters in the least developed regions, who assured  his victory, it also embodied their recognition of the poverty alleviation policies  introduced by the previous administration, which Lula extended and converted  into  a  material  anchor  for  his  symbolic  relationship  with  the  poor.  At  the  same  time  it  represented  a  renewal  of  the  somewhat  reticent  support  shown  for  his  economic policies during his first term, when expectations of faster growth were  frustrated  but  inflation  was  kept  low  and  Brazil’s  integration  with  the  global  flow of trade and finance was deepened. The challenge Lula faces in his second  term  is  to  convert  the  contradictory  messages  from  the  ballot  box  into  government actions that reaffirm belief not merely in symbols but in democratic                                                          This was the approach used to analyze “dependency situations” in Latin America by Enzo Faletto  and  Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso  in  the  1960s.  See  Dependency  and  Development  in  Latin  America,  Berkeley, University of California Press, 1979 (translated by Marjory Mattingly Urquidi).   4 This account of the Brazilian experience of stabilization and economic reform is based extensively  on  Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso,  A  Arte  da  Política:  a  história  que  vivi,  Rio  de  Janeiro,  Civilização  Brasileira, 2006.  3

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

3

  institutions and their ability to foster new social and economic advances without  relinquishing stability.  There are uncertainties on the horizon, as usual. Doubts about the long‐term  sustainability of the economic policies in place, with high interest rates and taxes,  and with a strong real, especially if the long cycle of global economic expansion  should end. Difficulties in continuing to finance the rising cost of social programs  and  the  government  machine  by  increasing  the  tax  burden,  cutting  investment  and  incurring  more  debt.  Conflict  between  the  president’s  appeals  to  private  investors and the statist tendencies preferred by so many in the ruling coalition.  Concern  with  the  disrepute  into  which  politicians  have  fallen  after  a  series  of  corruption scandals involving senior government officials, their party, and allies  in Congress.   None  of  this  seems  to  disturb  the  perception  of  most  Brazilians  that  “the  country  is  doing  all  right,”  in  the  words  of  one  of  Lula’s  campaign  jingles;  far  from  brilliantly,  not  as  well  as  other  developing  countries,  but  “all  right.”  Translation:  there  is  political  and  economic  stability  and  some  income  distribution to the poorest of the poor, but with losses for the middle class. The  assessments  of analysts and  local  and foreign investors are also  positive  for the  most  part.  Banks  and  major  corporations  closed  2006  with  modest  investments  but strong earnings. At the start of 2007 projected inflation was around 4 percent  per  year;  the  international  reserves  were  close  to  US$100  billion,  for  imports  of  US$91  million  and  external  debt  of  US$192  billion;  and  country‐risk  premiums  fell below 200 basis points, the lowest level since calculations began.   Brazil’s  situation  was  very  far  from  being  as  comfortable  at  the start  of  the  1990s.  Economic  stagnation  prevailed,  a  foreign  debt  moratorium  had  been  declared,  hyperinflation  was  at  the  gates,  and  the  hopes  and  expectations  awakened  by  democratization  were  giving  way  to  widespread  despondency.  A  consensus had formed among political scientists, economists, and observers that  a  combination  of  anachronistic  ideas,  defective  institutions,  and  lack  of  leadership  was  preventing  Brazil  from  making  the  changes  needed  to  control  inflation  and  resume  economic  growth.  While  sectors  of  academia,  the  state  technobureaucracy,  the  business  community,  and  the  media  were  discussing  reforms,  the  national‐statism  that  had  inspired  several  provisions  in  the  “economic order” chapter of the 1988 Constitution continued to exert a decisive  influence  on  the  opinions  of  most  politicians.  In  the  everyday  scrimmage  of  political activity, old clientelistic and populist practices sprang back like weeds in  the shade of democracy. In major decisions, the design of the nation’s institutions  weakened the parties and undermined support for the legislative proposals sent  to Congress by the president, threatening to reproduce the pattern of executive‐ legislative  conflict  that  had  led  to  the  1964  coup.  The  prospect  was  not  of  a 

4

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  complete  breakdown  but  of  slow  deterioration  in  democracy  for  lack  of  governability.5  The  political  literature  uses  the  term  doble  minoria  to  describe  the  recurrent  situation in Latin America where a president is brought to power by a minority  of  the  electorate  and  faces  difficulties  in  governing  for  lack  of  a  majority  in  Congress.6 In Brazil, the two‐round system for presidential elections introduced  by the 1988 Constitution solved the first problem but fragmentation of the party  system worsened the second. The Partido do Movimento Democrático Brasileiro  (PMDB)  had  been  the  sole  party  of  opposition  to  the  authoritarian  regime  and  won a  large majority in the 1986 Constituent Assembly,  but  then split  over  key  issues in the constitutional debate and whether to support President José Sarney  or remain in opposition. Collor de Mello won the 1989 presidential election even  though  he  formally  belonged  to  a  practically  nonexistent  party,  evidencing  the  premature  decay  of  the  parties  that  had  led  the  transition  to  democracy.  In  the  1990 elections the PMDB’s share of the lower house fell to a fifth, representing a  slim  relative  majority  among  the  19  parties  with  seats  in  the  Chamber  of  Deputies.   Lacking a majority in Congress was not a problem for Collor in his first year  as president because he was at the height of his popularity and a congressional  election was looming. In his second year he realized he would have to negotiate  with the main parties that had won seats in the new Congress, but by then it was  too  late.  With  his  popularity  rapidly  eroded  by  the  failure  of  his  anti‐inflation  policy  and  a  massive  corruption  scandal,  the  lack  of  a  consistent  majority  in  Congress prevented him from implementing the reforms he had promised and in  December 1992 forced him out of office.   Rising inflation and falling governability seemed to have caught Brazil in a  trap  that  was  draining  its  energy.  This  inspired  pessimistic  prognostications  about democracy’s ability to win or at least tie the race with the expectations of  social and economic progress which democracy itself had aroused.   The Real Plan Peaceful  mass  demonstrations  against  Collor  and  compliance  with  due  process  of  law  in  his  impeachment  rekindled  confidence  in  democracy.  Vice  President  Itamar Franco, an experienced politician, took over as president and appointed a  cabinet based on a broad coalition of parties that assured him a stable majority in  Congress.  

                                                        A representative sample of this view can be found in papers delivered by Brazilian and American  experts at a conference organized by the University of Miami and Fundação Getúlio Vargas in late  1991.  See  Siegfried  Marks,  ed.,  Political  Constraints  on  Brazil’s  Economic  Development:  Rio  de  Janeiro  Conference, Edited Proceedings and Papers, Miami, North‐South Center Press, 1993.  6 See Juan Lins and Arturo Valenzuela, eds., The Failure of Presidential Democracy: The Case of Latin  America, vol. 2, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.  5

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

5

  The  economic  climate  continued  to  deteriorate,  however.  The  wage‐price  spiral accelerated, fueled by indexation, and deprived business and government  of any stable value reference on which to base medium‐ and long‐term decisions.  Investors remained  retrenched,  although corporate  rates of return and liquidity  were  generally  positive.  Inflation  had  reached  30  percent  per  month  when  President Itamar Franco appointed his fourth finance minister, in May 1993.   As if this were not enough, political turbulence was back with a vengeance  as  Congress  plunged  into  rancorous  investigation  of  a  corruption  scandal  involving  kickbacks  in  the  distribution  of  budget  resources  that  was  to  lead  to  the expulsion of several congressmen, including the majority leader.  Under these circumstances it is understandable that our promise of frontally  combating  the  inflation  scourge  was  received  with  skepticism,  albeit  tempered  with  good  will,  by  the  media,  business,  most  congressmen,  and  the  general  public. With a president who had not been elected to that office (in Brazil, unlike  the  U.S.,  the  vice  president  is  simply  the  running  mate  of  the  presidential  candidate  and  most  voters  do  not  even  know  who  he  is)  and  with  Congress  semi‐paralyzed, few believed the political conditions existed to wage this battle  against  inflation.  Time  was  running  out,  moreover:  general  elections  were  scheduled  for  October  1994  and  a  constitutional  amendment  had  brought  forward  the  presidential  election  to  coincide  with  them.  In  little  over  a  year,  congressmen  would  leave  for  their  constituencies  to  campaign  and  it  would  be  impossible  to  pass  complex  legislation  requiring  the  physical  presence  of  a  majority on the floor of the house.   What Congress, the president and the people actually preferred was a price  freeze in the style of the 1986 Cruzado Plan, which had been followed by short‐ lived  euphoria  but  was  still  recalled  with  gratitude.  Analysts  accustomed  to  project  the  future  as  a  rerun  of  the  past  predicted  that  the  fiscal  austerity  measures included in the FHC Plan, as it was initially called, would end up like  similar  proposals  in  the  Sarney  and  Collor  administrations,  gathering  dust  on  some shelf in Congress or the Office of the President.   The  success  of  the  Real  Plan,  as  it  later  became  known,  and  the  cycle  of  change  unleashed  by  the  Plan  refuted  or  at  least  relativized  the  diagnoses  that  stressed  political  obstacles  to  stabilization  of  the  economy  and  the  implementation of reforms in Brazil.   Even  in  the  short  time  frame  allowed  by  the  electoral  calendar,  it  proved  possible  to  assemble  at  the  Finance  Ministry  an  experienced  and  creative  technical  team  to  furnish  indispensable  support  for  a  minister  who  was  not  an  economist,  formulate  an  innovative  stabilization  strategy  combining  orthodox  and heterodox measures, and win the political support to implement it—in this  case the minister’s experience as a member of Congress was valuable.   Fiscal  policy  had  undermined  the  credibility  of  previous  stabilization  programs  under  Presidents  Sarney  and  Collor.  The  first  stage  of  the  Real  Plan  comprised  a  series  of  measures  designed  to  cover  this  flank:  cuts  in  public 

6

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  spending,  de‐earmarking  of  some  revenues  that  the  Constitution  had  automatically  allocated  to  specific  expenditures,  a  new  tax  to  be  collected  by  banks  on  all  financial  transactions  including  the  cashing  of  checks,  and  debt  renegotiations with the states, several of which had been in or close to default for  some  years.  Although  they  were  insufficient  to  assure  long‐term  fiscal  equilibrium, these measures were submitted to the president, to Congress, and to  the nation as a first step in tackling the structural causes of inflation. In bringing  forward  the  proposals,  the  government  made  clear  that  it  had  no  intention  of  repeating  the  discredited  “shock  therapy”  tactics  applied  under  previous  anti‐ inflation  programs  with  a  heterodox  core,  and  showed  the  determination  to  dissolve the marriage between inflation and the public purse that had become a  hallmark  of  the  Brazilian  fiscal  regime.7  In  passing  the  measures,  Congress  indicated that it would be possible to build a consensus around a broader reform  program, giving economic agents a positive signal about the stabilization policy’s  chances of success. This momentum and the resulting credibility were boosted in  October 1993 when Brazil ended its debt moratorium in direct negotiations with  creditor banks and only informal support from the IMF.   We  believed  orthodox  fiscal  measures  were  a  necessary  but  not  sufficient  condition to tackle inflation at the very high levels it had reached. At some point  it  would  be  necessary  to  dismantle  the  wage  and  price  indexation  mechanisms  that  had  become  generalized  in  the  1980s  and  were  feeding  back  into  inflation  via  inertia,  making  past  inflation  rates  the  floor  for  future  inflation.  The  innovative,  and  to  a  certain  extent  audacious,  aspect  of  this  operation  was  the  radicalization  of  indexation  as  an  antidote  to  indexation  itself,  in  a  move  that  recalled  homeopathy’s  first  law,  similia  similibus  curantor.  A  daily  indexation  mechanism was introduced in February 1994 (the URV, or “real value unit”) as a  reference for spontaneous resets to contracts and prices before the new currency  began  circulating  on  July  1.  This  avoided  litigation  among  private  agents,  or  between  them  and  the  state,  to  “decouple”  contractual  rights  and  obligations  before  and  after  the  onset  of  the  stabilization  program.  Litigation  arising  from  previous programs has resulted in a towering stack of liabilities for the National  Treasury.  In  the  case  of  the  Real  Plan  only  one  provision  has  ever  been  invalidated by the courts, with comparatively minor consequences. Legal armor‐ plating was a key factor in the Real Plan’s credibility.   From 47 percent per month on the eve of the currency change, inflation fell  to less than 3 percent per month after 30 days and has remained at a single‐digit  per year level ever since.   The first batch of opinion polls on the presidential election, released in May  1994, had shown Lula clearly  in the lead on 40 percent. In  October we won the                                                          The implicit rationale for this marriage was that nominal revenue growth coupled with corrosion  of  expected  expenditure  in  real  terms  guaranteed  a  balanced  budget  a  posteriori,  or  something  along  these  lines,  allowing  the  government  and  Congress  to  avoid  the  discomfort  of  negotiating  priorities and spending cuts a priori. 

7

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

7

  election  outright  in  the  first  round  with  over  half  of  all  valid  votes  cast.  This  result  was  due  mainly  to  the  optimism  aroused  by  the  Real  Plan,  which  also  cemented the coalition of parties that backed our campaign, comprising our own  party,  the  Partido  da  Social  Democracia  Brasileira  (PSDB),  and  two  center‐right  parties,  the  Partido  da  Frente  Liberal  (PFL)  and  Partido  Trabalhista  Brasileiro  (PTB),  broadened  in  the  center  by  the  inclusion  of  the  PMDB  after  the  election.  Although  our  program  was  by  no  means  limited  to  this  issue,  consolidating  stabilization  (or  “holding  on  tight  to  the  real”  as  the  popular  saying  put  it)  became  the  basic  commitment  as  a  function  of  which  our  government  sought  support from Congress and society and would be assessed at the end of the day.   Stabilization and Structural Reform Controlling  inflation  was  to  be  not  the  end  but  the  beginning  of  an  ambitious  agenda  for  change,  as  we  had  insisted  all  along.  We  had  a  clear  vision  of  the  course  to  steer.  The  overall  vision  as  well  as  several  specific  measures  on  this  agenda had been outlined in the original planning documents for the Real Plan.8  But  the path  was made  by  walking,  and  there were many unexpected boulders  and bends.   The initial impact of price stabilization on wages and incomes in general at  the  base  of  society  anticipated  the  bonus  and  deferred  the  onus  of  the  reforms  needed to consolidate stability. A neoclassical economist would have advised us  to do the opposite, anticipating the onus while fueling expectations of the bonus.  Recalling Machiavelli’s teachings about the risks that lie in wait for a reforming  ruler,  we  saw  this  inversion  of  conventional  economic  logic  as  a  political  opportunity  to  sustain  the  support  of  the  unorganized  majority  who  stood  ultimately  to  gain  from  the  reforms  and  neutralize  resistance  from  well‐ organized  affluent  minorities.  We  were  by  no  means  unaware  of  the  risk  of  “reform fatigue.” However, we were confident that relief at the sharp reduction  in inflation would help Brazilian society finally see its age‐old ills for what they  were and fuel demands for more progress in combating them. We would have to  walk  a  razor’s  edge  between  these two  collective  sentiments: the blossoming of  aspirations  in  response  to  the  changes  we  had  begun,  and  frustration  with  the  pace and cost of completing the changes.  Our starting point was the conviction that the combination of superinflation,  fiscal disequilibrium, foreign debt, and economic stagnation, which had dragged  on since the 1980s, signaled the end of a development cycle in Brazil without the  foundations  having  been  laid  for  another  cycle.  The  crisis  had  well‐known  proximate  causes,  from  external  oil  and  interest‐rate  shocks  to  mistakes  and  omissions  by  successive  governments.  But  its  underlying  cause  was  the  bankruptcy  of  the  centralist  interventionist  state  founded  by  the  dictatorship  of                                                           See  the  Explanatory  Memoranda  to  the  July  1993  Immediate  Action  Plan  and  the  July  1994  measure  that  introduced  the  real.  Both  can  be  accessed  on  the  Finance  Ministry’s  Website:  http://www.fazenda.gov.br/portugues/real/realhist.asp. 

8

8

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  Getúlio  Vargas  (1937–45)  and  reinforced  by  the  military  regime  (1964–85).  Having  enabled  Brazil  to  enjoy  50  years  of  strong  growth,  albeit  with  income  concentration  and  social  marginalization,  this  state  model  had  exhausted  its  ability  to  drive  industrialization  via  state‐owned  enterprises,  protectionist  barriers, and subsidies to private enterprise.   In our view there could be no lasting economic stability, let alone a sustained  resumption  of  growth,  if  Brazil  remained  outside  the  expanding  international  flow  of  trade,  investment,  and  technology.  Despite  the  crisis,  many  Brazilian  companies  had  managed  to  modernize  their  production  and  management  methods,  albeit  less  so  their  plant  and  equipment.  In  contrast  with  the  public  sector,  private  enterprise  was  not  excessively  indebted.  Although  business  organizations  had  been  taken  by  surprise  by  the  abrupt  trade  liberalization  promoted  by  the  Collor  administration,  generally  speaking  they  displayed  the  capacity to face greater exposure to international competition.   To  make  its  economy  more  competitive  overall,  however,  Brazil  needed  a  different  state  model.  Neither  the  grand  protagonist  of  development,  as  in  the  past,  nor  the  neoliberal  minimalist  state,  but  the  “necessary  state,”  as  we  preferred  to  call  it:  with  more  brains  and  muscle  than  bureaucratic  mass  to  respond  in  a  timely  manner  to  the  opportunities  and  turbulence  of  globalized  capitalism. More focused on coordinating and regulating private enterprise than  on  intervening  directly  in  the  economy.  And  just  as  importantly,  capable  of  fulfilling  the  promises  of  democracy  in  the  social  sphere  without  making  the  very  beneficiaries  of  those  promises—workers,  pensioners,  the  poorest  in  general—pay for them via inflation “tax.”   The 1988 Constitution was not only vast, rambling, and excessively detailed;  it was also highly contradictory, and still is to a large extent. It embodied major  advances  for  fundamental  citizens’  rights  and  safeguards,  as  well  as  generous  provision for social rights, yet at the same time it reflected  the entrenchment of  vested interests linked to the structures of the Vargas state, as well as privileges  typical  of  the  deep‐seated  patrimonialism  of  Brazilian  culture  and  political  institutions.   The  state‐owned  enterprises  were  accommodated  by  inclusion  in  the  Constitution  of  the  monopoly  they  already  held  in  oil  and  gas  as  well  as  telecommunications.  In  mining  and  shipping  there  was  no  state  monopoly,  but  the Constitution established exclusivity for Brazilian‐owned companies. In both  cases  the  consequence  was  insufficient  investment  or  none  at  all.  The  state‐ owned  electric  power  utilities  were  also  lagging  behind  with  investments.  The  severe  fiscal  crisis  meant  it  was  necessary  to  eliminate  or  ease  the  constraints  written  into  the  Constitution  and  define  rules  whereby  the  effort  to  foster  expansion  in  these  sectors  could  be  shared  with  private  enterprise,  including  foreign capital. Otherwise the incipient resumption of growth would be aborted  by infrastructure bottlenecks.  

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

9

  For  public‐sector  workers  and  civil  servants  the  Constitution  guaranteed  a  highly privileged pension scheme, both in terms of the age, length of service, and  contribution  requirements,  and  in  terms  of  the  cash  values  involved.  Private‐ sector  employees  covered  by  the  official  scheme  had  far  fewer  advantages  but  nevertheless  saw  their  benefits  guaranteed  and/or  extended.  Expenditure  was  rising faster than the capacity to generate revenue, and as a result both systems  began to display growing deficits that would eventually place a huge burden on  society  as  a  whole,  by  forcing  an  increase  in  taxation,  driving  up  inflation,  or  pressuring interest rates. Any increase in payroll taxes for the private sector as a  palliative measure to contain deficit growth, on the other hand, would lead to a  rise  in  informality,  whereby  a  large  proportion  of  the  workforce  would  be  left  without  any  social  security  coverage  at  all.  In  sum,  contrary  to  the  promised  universalization  of  rights,  the  Constitution  enshrined  a  social  security  and  pension  system  that  was  highly  stratified,  lopsided,  and  unsustainable  in  the  long term.   Public‐sector workers also benefited from the extension to all civil servants,  including  the  large  number  hired  without  competitive  examinations,  of  job  security for life and a ban on pay cuts, both of which are reserved for judges in  most  countries.  This  hindered  any  more  ambitious  effort  to  modernize  the  machinery of government, as well as making payroll expansion almost inevitable  in all three tiers of government (federal, state, and municipal).   It  was  imperative  to  correct  these  distortions  for  reasons  of  both  efficiency  and  equity.  This  is  what  we  proposed  in  a  series  of  bills  to  amend  the  Constitution’s  provisions  on  state  monopolies,  the  definition  of  a  Brazilian‐ owned  company,  social  security  and  pensions,  and  public  service.  The  package  was  submitted  to  Congress  shortly  after  the  new  government  took  office  in  January  1995.  The  committee  stage  and  voting  on  the  entire  swathe  of  constitutional  amendments  lasted  throughout  the  1995–98  presidential  term.  Passage of enabling legislation took longer, with pension reform extending until  the end of our second term in 2002.   Battle on Several Fronts For  the  general  public  the  debate  about  reform  was  basically  indistinguishable  from  the  marches  and  countermarches  that  revolved  around  the  constitutional  amendments.  These  were  in  fact  an  important  part  but  only  a  part  of  the  state  reforms  carried  out  in  this  eight‐year  period.  Consolidation  of  stability  entailed  efforts on several fronts.   Financial relations, and behind them the balance of power, in the sphere of  the  federation  were  arduously  renegotiated  until  agreement  was  reached  on  a  legal  framework  that  would  limit  the  future  indebtedness  of  states  (as  well  as  some  medium  and  large  cities),  encourage  them  to  adjust  their  accounts,  and  guarantee payment of installments on debts assumed by the federal government. 

10

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  In  this  process  several  state  banks  used  by  the  respective  governments  for  uncontrolled debt issuance were closed or privatized.   Private‐sector  banks  were  affected  to  varying  degrees  by  the  loss  of  the  inflation  revenue  they  were  accustomed  to  pocketing  on  unremunerated  deposits. A  program  was established  to restructure  and  strengthen  the banking  sector,  leading  to  changes  of  ownership  for  distressed  institutions,  limiting  the  losses  to  depositors,  and  above  all  averting  systemic  or  cascading  bank  failure,  whose  effects  would  have  been  devastating.  Federal  financial  institutions  were  also restructured and capitalized.   The Collor administration had removed most nontariff barriers and reduced  import tariffs. Currency stability and appreciation against the dollar made trade  liberalization effective. Contrary to widespread  predictions,  this did not  lead to  the destruction of Brazilian industry. Despite difficulties here or there, industry  as  a  whole  responded  positively  to  liberalization.  It  took  advantage  of  the  favorable  exchange  rate  to  import  high‐tech  plant  and  inputs,  benefited  from  expansion  of  the  domestic  market,  and  basically  maintained  the  same  level  of  complexity and integration across branches.   The  state  had  to  make  its  own  contribution  toward  the  reforms  needed  for  growth to resume under the new conditions arising from economic opening.   BNDES, the national development bank, increased disbursements fivefold in  the period 1994–98, to a level above R$20 billion per year. The presence of such a  large development bank is unique among the emerging countries and was of key  importance to the restructuring of production capacity in Brazil’s private sector.   Government  agencies  of  no  significance  or  simply  nonexistent  in  a  closed  economy  had  to  be  strengthened  or  created  in  areas  such  as  export  promotion,  antitrust, agricultural defense, intellectual property, and support for innovation.  Structuring such agencies helped pave the way for strong export growth in both  commodities and manufactures from 1999 on.   The  entry  of  private  enterprise  into  infrastructure  sectors  required  a  new  legal framework for the granting of public service concessions and the creation of  a  hitherto  unknown  entity  in  the  organization  of  the  Brazilian  state:  regulatory  bodies  with  the  powers  and  political  independence  to  protect  the  rights  of  consumers in their relations with service providers. Several such regulators were  created  following  the  passage  of  constitutional  amendments  on  oil,  electricity,  and telecommunications.   The  real  was  born  close  to  parity  with  the  dollar  but  not  legally  pegged  to  the dollar as the Argentine peso had been by the Cavallo Plan (1991). Rather than  dollarization,  we  insisted  on  less  attractive  issues  such  as  combating  the  public  deficit  and  balancing  the  budget.  This  had  important  implications  for  the  consolidation  of  stability  in  Brazil.  Successive  attempts  to  realign  the  exchange  rate  in  terms  more  favorable  to  Brazilian  exports  were  aborted  by  external  financial  crises  in  the  second  half  of  the  1990s.  Gradual  devaluation  of  the  real  against  the  dollar  until  the  end  of  1998  lagged  behind  domestic  inflation. 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

11

  Realignment  eventually  happened  of  necessity  in  January  1999,  when  the  risk  that  our  foreign‐exchange  reserves  would  be  dangerously  depleted  by  a  fierce  speculative attack forced the Central Bank to float the real. Widespread fears of a  banking  crisis  and  inflation  acceleration  proved  unfounded.  The  structural  changes  already  in  place,  albeit  incomplete  from  our  standpoint,  proved  sufficient to stabilize the economy without the “exchange‐rate anchor.”   The  battle  to  bring  states,  municipalities,  and  the  federal  sphere  itself  into  line behind the banner of fiscal sustainability intensified with the introduction of  a  floating  exchange‐rate  regime  and  inflation  targeting  in  1999.  To  crown  this  normative effort, the Fiscal Responsibility Act passed in May 2000 applied strict  rules to all three tiers of government regarding indebtedness and the creation of  payroll and other permanent expenses.   Last but by no means least, instruments of state action had to be redesigned  in order to fulfill promises of rights universalization in the social sphere. Also via  constitutional  amendment,  new  rules  were  established  for  participation  by  the  federal, state, and municipal governments in the financing of primary education  and  healthcare,  and  a  Fund  to  Combat  Poverty  was  created.  The  criteria  for  investment of these funds represented a major advance toward equity in public  spending,  since  they  prioritized  the  poorest  and  most  vulnerable  strata  of  the  population,  who  had  traditionally  benefited  least  from  social  programs.  Comprehensive  changes  to  the  design  and  execution  of  essential  programs  in  these areas enhanced spending efficiency, especially through decentralization via  the  transfer  of  federal  funds  and  activities  to  states  and  municipalities,  partnerships with civil society, and systematic assessment of outcomes.  Not all the reforms advanced as much as we would have liked. We lack the  necessary  distance  to  judge  how  far  they  succeeded  and  we  cannot  guarantee  they have reached the point of no return. However, it seems undeniable that they  have now helped sustain the stability of the Brazilian economy for more than 12  years. It may be too soon to say whether they have also laid the foundations for  such a significant long‐term change as the creation of a new development model,  as we intended.9 

The Drawbacks and Force of Democratic Reformism  Plebiscitary or Consensual Democracy? Modern formulations of the notion of political leadership emphasize institutional  position  and  “mission.”  Outside  this  context  the  discussion  of  a  leader’s                                                          Mauricio Font speaks of “structural realignment” in referring to the balance of change in Brazil in  this  period.  See  Transforming  Brazil:  A  Reform  Era  in  Perspective,  Lanham  (Maryland),  Rowman  &  Littlefield,  2003.  For  an  analysis  of  the  reforms  by  Brazilian  scholars, some  of  whom  participated  actively in their implementation, see Fabio Giambiagi, José Guilherme Reis, and André Urani, eds.,  Reformas no Brasil: balanço e agenda, Rio de Janeiro, Nova Fronteira, 2004.  9

12

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  motivations  and  personal  attributes  falls  into  the  banality  of  psychological  and  even  biological  generalization.10  Our  thoughts  on  the  role  of  leadership  in  the  reform  process  start  from  these  two  dimensions.  In  the  case  of  the  head  of  a  democratic  government,  position  is  basically  defined  by  power  sharing  and  “mission”  by  the  expectations  of  the  led  in  their  triple  status  as  citizen‐voters,  voices of public opinion, and members of organized social sectors.   Let  us  begin  with  the  relations  with  Congress  and  the  parties,  which  are  critical  to  any  president’s  ability  to  lead  in  Brazil  and  other  Latin  American  countries with presidential systems.   Our reform agenda was extensive and complex, and (it bears repeating) took  up  most  of  the  order  of  business  in  Congress  for  several  years.  In  all,  35  constitutional  amendments  were  passed  between  1995  and  2002—36  if  we  include the amendment that enabled the requisite fiscal adjustment to be made in  preparation for the Real Plan in 1993.11 Each one could be passed only by three‐ fifths of both houses, with two readings in each house, the Chamber of Deputies  and  Senate.  Because  the  rules  of  the  lower  house  allowed  (and,  within  certain  limits,  still  allow)  any  party  to  demand  that  parts  of  a  bill  be  voted  separately,  the  three‐fifths  quorum  had  to  be  achieved  for  hundreds  of  votes.  Over  500  supplementary  laws,  ordinary  laws,  and  relevant  provisional  measures  were  passed in the same period.   It  is  most  unlikely  that  a  reform  process  would  have  entailed  such  a  huge  effort  at  building  a  consensus  with  the  legislative  branch  in  any  other  Latin  American  country.  Did  this  represent  a  disadvantage?  Considering  the  gap  between  our  goals  and  what  we  actually  succeeded  in  achieving,  the  answer  is  perhaps  affirmative:  the  need  to  negotiate  with  Congress  and  the  social  sectors  represented  there  every  single  step  of  the  way  did  result  to  some  extent  in  a  slower pace and a narrower scope for the measures we proposed. But democracy  and economic efficiency are not mutually negotiable goals in our view, as noted  at the start of this paper. Nor do we believe that Brazil has done worse than those  of its neighbors who implemented reforms the authoritarian way.   Chile  under  General  Augusto  Pinochet  (1973–90)  is  always  cited  as  an  example of successful reforms imposed without consulting Congress, which had  been  closed,  or  society,  or  at  least  the  working  class,  which  was  silenced  by  vicious repression. Dictatorship is said to have been a necessary evil that enabled  the  Chilean  economy  to  steer  the  “right  course  to  growth”  from  the  liberal  standpoint,  including  deregulation,  privatization,  trade  liberalization,  and  fiscal  equilibrium. This view underestimates the price paid by the Chilean people, not  only  in  lost  liberties  and  rights  but  also  in  terms  of  material  hardship.  An                                                          See Orazio M. Petracca, “Liderança,” in Norberto Bobbio et al., Dicionário de Política, São Paulo,  Editora UnB e Imprensa Oficial do Estado de São Paulo, 2004, pp. 713–716.  11 The text of the Brazilian Constitution, including all amendments passed until now, can be read  on  the  following  page  of  the  Office  of  the  President’s  Website:  http://www.planalto.gov.br/  ccivil_03/Constituicao/Constitui%E7ao.htm.   10

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

13

  orthodox  shock  program  to  tackle  inflation  caused  a  recession  of  more  than  11  percent  in  1975.  The  financial  crisis  that  forced  devaluation  of  the  peso  (Pinochet’s “Chicago boys” also used an exchange‐rate anchor) triggered another  recession in 1982. Unemployment soared to nearly 20 percent and fell below 10  percent only in the late 1980s.12 The proportion of the population living below the  poverty  line  reached  45  percent  in  1985;  today  it  has  returned  to  the  level  prevailing at the end of the 1960s, around 17 percent.13  Nor can it be said that Concertación por la Democracia was lucky enough to  receive the house in order in 1990. Inflation was 17 percent in Pinochet’s last year  and  did  not  fall  to  single‐digit  levels  until  1995.  Although  the  Concertación  coalition  retained  the  principles  of  deregulation,  privatization,  and  economic  openness,  it  introduced  a  more  rigorous  fiscal  policy  while  also  restoring  workers’  rights  and  investing  strongly  in  social  policies.14  And  it  did  this  by  consensus building in Congress and with organized sectors of society despite the  discretionary  resources  conferred  on  the  executive  by  Chile’s  hyper‐ presidentialist Constitution.15 Chile’s GDP grew 5.5 percent per year on average  in  the  period  1990–2004,  under  Concertación‐led  governments,  compared  with  only 3.1 percent in the period 1974–89.16   If Chile stands out in Latin America as a successful case of integration into  the global economy, it is thanks not to the legacy of the dictatorship but to what  its democratic leaders have been able to achieve by leaving that legacy behind.   In  Argentina  the  military  junta  that  seized  power  in  1976  attempted  liberal  reforms  similar  to  Chile’s  via  the  same  authoritarian  road  but  the  results  were  disastrous,  and  the  Malvinas/Falklands  war  made  a  handover  to  civilian  rule  inevitable  in  1983.  President  Raúl  Alfonsín  (1983–89)  received  an  economy  that  had  been  in  deep  recession  for  two  years  with  inflation  running  at  over  300  percent.   In contrast with Chile’s, Argentina’s democratic leaders had a difficult time  establishing  a  lasting  consensus  on  the  direction  of  the  economy.  Alfonsín’s  reform  proposals  foundered  in  the  face  of  Peronist  opposition  and  lack  of  support  from  his  own  Unión  Cívica  Radical  (UCR).  A  price  freeze  attempted                                                           Unless  otherwise  noted,  all  data  on  GDP,  unemployment,  and  inflation  in  Latin  American  countries  are  from  the  World  Bank,  compiled  for  this  paper  by  Juliana  Wenceslau  at  the  Brasília  office of IBRD.  13  See  Dagmar  Racynski  and  Claudia  Serrano,  “Las  políticas  y  estrategias  de  desarrollo  social.  Aportes de los años 90 y desafios futuros,” in Patrício Meller, ed., La Paradoja Aparente. Equidad y  eficiencia: resolviendo el dilema, Santiago de Chile, Aguilar Chilena, 2005, pp. 259–260.  14  For  a  detailed  analysis  of  the  economic  and  social  orientations  and  achievements  of  Concertación‐led  governments  compared  with  the  legacy  of  the  dictatorship,  see  Patrício  Meller,  ed., op. cit.  15  On  this  subject,  see  Peter  M.  Siavelis,  The  President  and  Congress  in  Postauthoritarian  Chile:  Institutional  Constraints  to  Democratic  Consolidation,  University  Park,  PA:  Pennsylvania  State  University Press, 2000.  16  See  Oscar  Landerretche  M.,  “Construyendo  solvencia  fiscal:  el  éxito  macroeconómico  de  la  Concertación,” in Meller, op. cit., pp. 83–137.  12

14

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  under the Austral Plan ended in more  recession  and  inflation  of more  than  600  percent in 1985, opening the gates for the Peronists to return to government with  President Carlos Menem (1989–99). In 1991, as hyperinflation threatened to break  out, Menem managed to wrest support from the Peronist Partido Justicialista (PJ)  and  the  opposition  for  the  stabilization  program  mounted  by  Finance  Minister  Domingo Cavallo. In addition to fixing the peso by law at parity with the dollar,  the  plan  included  a  fast‐track  privatization  process.  In  1992,  the  Olivos  Pact  between  Peronists  and  Radicals  laid  the  basis  for  convening  a  Constituent  Assembly that introduced some of the reforms proposed previously by Alfonsín.  But Menem’s preferred instrument for implementing economic policy, including  privatization,  deregulation,  and  what  little  downsizing  of  government  he  undertook, was legislative delegation to the executive, which freed the president  of the need to negotiate measures point by point with Congress.17  Without ceasing to be democratic, the road to reform in Menem’s Argentina  appears to have had a pronounced plebiscitary element, in which the inflationary  crisis  predisposed  the  parties  and  society  to  accept  “heroic”  measures  and  concentrated the initiative in the hands of the president. In contrast, the Chilean  and  Brazilian  experiences  fell  distinctly  into  the  camp  of  “consensual  democracy,”  in  which  the  executive  must  negotiate  and  trade  concessions  with  the groups that have the power to veto its proposals.18  Argentina’s  shortcut  to stabilization may look faster  at first  sight but  it  did  not go so far in terms of structural reform, and ultimately seems to have resulted  in weaker rather than stronger institutions, as evidenced by the 2001–02 foreign‐ exchange  and  financial  crisis.  A  preference  for  tortuous  consensus  building  led  Chile and Brazil to more solid results from the institutional standpoint. There is a  significant difference between the two countries in this regard: while the agenda  pursued by the Concertación can perhaps be said to have focused on rebuilding  democratic  social  and  political  institutions  on  the  scorched  earth  left  behind  by  the  dictatorship,  the  Brazilian  reforms  simultaneously  addressed  the  need  to  build  new  institutions  and  to  remove  the  detritus  of  the  old  Vargas  state,  possibly paying a higher political price for that.   The “Political Preconditions” Fallacy The inflationary crisis also functioned as the “midwife of history” in Brazil. With  almost daily price rises averaging more than 20 percent per month, practically no  sector was immune from the burden of superinflation. Everyone was affected in  some  way:  wage  workers,  pensioners,  and  retirees,  by  accelerating  corrosion  of                                                           On  Argentina’s  experience  with  stabilization  and  reform,  see  Vicente  Palermo,  “Melhorar  para  piorar? A dinâmica política das reformas estruturais e as raízes do colapso da convertibilidade,” in  Brasílio Sallum Jr., ed., Brasil e Argentina hoje: política e economia, Bauru, SP, EDUSC, 2004, Chap. 3.  18  The  distinction  between  majoritarian  and  consensual  democracy  is  explored  in  Arend  Lijphart,  Democracies: Patterns of Majoritarian and Consensus Government in Twenty‐One Countries, New  Haven & London, Yale University Press, 1984, pp. 177‐207.  17

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

15

  the  purchasing  power  of  their  fixed  earnings;  self‐employed  workers  and  small  business  owners  without  access  to  the  banking  system,  by  depreciation  of  their  limited  cash  assets;  the  upper‐middle  class  and  business,  by  the  immense  difficulty  of  calculating,  planning,  and  investing  in  a  superinflationary  environment,  even  with  access  to  index‐linked  financial  instruments.  This  boosted potential support for any plausible proposal to control inflation in so far  as it diminished resistance to the necessary sacrifices.   Thus  Brazil  under  the  Real  Plan  and  Argentina  under  the  Cavallo  Plan  are  examples of the tendency detected by Albert Hirschman in the early 1980s, when  he investigated what he called the social and political matrix of inflation in Latin  America:  “Beyond  a  threshold  of  tolerance,  inflation  certainly  is  the  kind  of  pressing  policy  problem  that  increases  the  willingness  of  governments  to  take  action, in spite of opposition from powerful interests, if there is firm expectation  that the action will help restrain the inflation.”19  To this effect of inflation was added in our case the weakening of traditional  political forces for strictly political reasons. We mentioned earlier the exceptional  circumstances  that justified  skepticism  about  the  chances  of success  of  a  frontal  attack  on  inflation  after  the  impeachment  of  Collor:  lack  of  direct  electoral  backing for his legal alternate, the corruption scandal that had all but paralyzed  Congress,  and  pressure  from  the  electoral  calendar.  Paradoxically,  these  very  circumstances were what made the Real Plan possible. What analysts diagnosed  as  a  lack  of  political  preconditions  turned  out  in  fact  to  be  a  window  of  opportunity.  In  normal  conditions  the  groups  that  benefited  one  or  way  or  another  from  inflation  and  state  disorganization,  including  segments  of  Congress,  the  private  sector,  and  the  state  bureaucracy  itself,  would  have  mobilized more effectively to defend their interests. Only the disarray in which  traditional  political  forces  found  themselves  can  explain  why  they  allowed  themselves to be defeated—or persuaded—by a minister and his small group of  aides  and  sympathizers  in  the  government,  with  the  president’s  support,  it  is  true, but with very hesitant backing from other parties apart from our own, the  PSDB.   The art of politics consists of creating the conditions to achieve an objective  for which the conditions are not given in advance. This is why politics is an art  and  not  a  technique.  And  its  principal  weapon  in  a  democracy  is  persuasion.  Thanks  to  persuasion,  to  the  winning  over  of  public  opinion,  it  eventually  proved possible to build a minimum of consensus where it was presumably most  difficult and certainly most necessary: inside the government, in Congress and in  the  parties—that  is,  among  the  actors  who  make  political  decisions  or  prevent  them  from  being  made.  In  the  midst  of  many  doubts  we  had  one  certainty,  grounded  in  the  values  of  our  democratic  upbringing:  that  only  a  program                                                           Albert  Hirschman,  “The  Social  and  Political  Matrix  of  Inflation:  Elaborations  on  the  Latin  American  Experience,”  in  Essays  in  Trespassing:  Economics  to  Politics  and  Beyond,  Cambridge,  Cambridge University Press, 1981. 

19

16

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  capable of being explained and understood by ordinary people would be able to  inflict  a  lasting  defeat  on  inflation  and  set  in  motion  the  reorganization  of  the  Brazilian state.   Credibility  was  a  key  prerequisite  in  a  country  that  had  suffered  the  consequences of the failure of successive stabilization programs in recent years.  We  benefited  from  the  good  will  of  the  media,  most  business  leaders,  other  organized  sectors  of  society,  and  Congress  itself.  Despite  skepticism  about  our  chances  of  success  they  trusted  the  minister’s  seriousness  of  purpose  and  the  competence of his team. Aware of the importance of maintaining and broadening  this basis of trust, we decided that there would be no surprises and no promises  that  could  not  easily  be  met:  each  step  in  our  stabilization  strategy  would  be  announced in advance and explained to the general public, always making clear  that what was involved was not unilateral action by the government but a process  whose  outcome  depended  on  the  continuing  convergence  of  the  efforts  of  government, Congress, private economic agents, and society as a whole.   We  often  came  close  to  losing  the  battle  for  trust.  As  the  months  went  by,  society  became  more  and  more  anxious  about  the  acceleration  of  inflation,  pressure  built  up  in  the  government  itself  for  decisive  action,  and  there  was  increasing  resistance  from  parties  and  leaders  who  saw  the  possibility  of  a  successful stabilization program as a defeat for their own political plans.   The removal of an entire currency from circulation and its replacement with  a  new  one  brought  a  fundamental  reinforcement  to  this  battle  for  trust  and  credibility:  the  symbol  represented  by  the  real,  which  synthesized  the  expectations of change diffused throughout society.   Even before the new currency began circulating, the parties’ and politicians’  radars  had  begun  capturing  the  public’s  change  of  mood.  The  perception  that  this  could  drive  a  competitive  presidential  candidacy  facilitated  the  task  of  winning support for our proposals in Congress.   This  is  how  the  breakthrough  was  achieved:  launched  under  the  sign  of  a  “lack  of  political  preconditions,”  the  Real  Plan  was  itself  to  become  the  precondition for a realignment of political forces in favor of the reforms.   Almost  by  saturation,  the  old  order  gave  way  to  the  new.  Victory  in  the  presidential  election  provided  the  opportunity  and  responsibility  of  anchoring  this new situation in the bedrock of the nation’s institutions, of moving forward  with an extensive agenda of reforms necessary to “hold on tight to the real” and  keep the hopes deposited in it alive.   Testing the Limits of Latin American Presidentialism The  success  of  the  Real  Plan  owed  much  to  this  seizing  of  a  window  of  opportunity. It took eight years of unremitting effort to consolidate stability. The  continuity  of  the  progress  it  was  possible  to  achieve  throughout  this  period  depended on a political strategy with two pillars: (1) building a stable majority in  Congress  by  sharing  power  in  the  executive  with  the  parties  in  the  ruling 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

17

  coalition; and (2) leveraging the president’s leadership to bring to bear both the  government’s  forces  and  those  of  the  coalition  parties  to  push  for  reform,  with  the support of public opinion and the organized sectors of society.   A president can often use constitutional instruments to transform his will if  not into law at least into decrees or provisional measures with the force of law,20  and  even  the  authority  to  ensure  his  orders  are  obeyed  through  recognition  of  the  legitimacy  of  his  decisions.  However,  to  be  politically  effective  by  winning  more support or smoothing the way to implementing his proposals, he does not  fully  exercise  this  virtual  power  but  instead  goes  about  creating  situations  in  which, although his will is not entirely patent, the policies and decisions he aims  to pursue stand a greater chance of success.   It  so  happens  that  the  executive,  represented  by  the  president  and  his  cabinet,  is  only  a  part  of  the  system  of  power  (not  to  mention  the  domination  structurally  exercised  by  classes  and  segments  of  classes,  organized  in  the  nonformal  command  structure,  and  which  bring  pressure  to  bear  on  a  day‐to‐ day basis  and have at their  disposal  power  resources  entrenched  in a thousand  ways in social practices). Congress, the parties, the courts, to cite only the formal  components of the command structure, condition the political game.   The  crises  that  led  to  the  resignation  of  President  Jânio  Quadros  and  the  ouster of President João Goulart in the 1960s, and to the impeachment of Collor,  left a clear lesson: the main question for the president is not if but how he should  share power. The worst mistake he can make is to imagine he has a mandate to  govern alone. In order to do what he has promised those who voted for him, he  needs  Congress.  And  to  assure  himself  of  a  majority  in  Congress,  he  needs  to  build alliances, since the heterogeneity of the federation and the peculiarities of  the  Brazilian  system  of  proportional  representation  produce  party‐political  fragmentation in which no single party wields a majority.  With these lessons of history in mind, we set out to weld an alliance between  our own party, the PSDB, and the PFL and PTB in the presidential election, and  later to include the PMDB and Partido Progressita Brasileiro (PPB) in the ruling  coalition.  A  balance  among  the  larger  parties,  preventing  our  own  party  from  controlling  Congress  even  when  it  won  a  majority  in  the  lower  house  after  the  1998 elections, proved fundamental to assuring political stability.   A  respectable  current  of  political  scientists  considers  Latin  American  presidentialism  a  lost  cause.  Party  fragmentation,  on  one  hand,  and  the  independence  and  rigidity  of  the  mandates  of  president  and  Congress,  on  the  other,  are  believed  to  lead  to  recurrent  political  impasses.21  The  PSDB,  inspired  by  this  sort  of  diagnosis,  declared  itself  parliamentarist  in  its  1988  founding  manifesto.  Parliamentarism  sustained  a  crushing  defeat  in  a  plebiscite  held  in  1993. Irony of history: we lost the plebiscite and a year later won the presidential                                                           The  Brazilian  Constitution  authorizes  the  president  in  cases  of  urgency  to  issue  provisional  measures with the force of law, which lose validity unless they are ratified by Congress in 90 days.  21 Juan Linz and Arturo Valenzuela, op. cit., is representative of this type of approach.  20

18

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  election, thus having to assume the task of assuring not just the survival but the  good health of the system we had considered doomed.   More  recent  studies  underscore  the  idea  that  in  Latin  America  instead  of  presidentialism it is more appropriate to speak of presidentialisms in the plural.  The risk of an impasse is ever present. The means and modes of avoiding it vary  according to the specificities of executive‐legislative relations, party organization,  and the contents of the decisions on the agenda. Only by taking these variables  into account, in addition to generalizations about systems of government, would  it  be  possible  to  explain  the  positive,  albeit  problematical,  results  achieved  by  democracy in some countries of the region.22   A peculiarity of Brazil in this regard is the coexistence between the relative  weakness of the parties and the strength of Congress as an arena for negotiating  and  decision making. We are  an extreme  case of multiparty politics,  with  some  20  parties  represented  in  the  Chamber  of  Deputies,  five  or  six  of  them  relevant  and none with more than 20 percent of the seats. Argentina, Chile, and Mexico,  in contrast, are cases of moderately concentrated pluriparty systems.   The  Argentine  and  Chilean  dictatorships  closed  Congress  and  banned  parties  but  were  unable  to  destroy  them  in  practice,  at  least  not  the  largest  parties.  The  UCR  (Radicals)  and  PJ  (Peronists),  which  had  polarized  Argentine  politics  since  1945,  like  Chile’s  PDC  (Christian  Democrats)  and  PS  (Socialists),  which  date  back  to  the  1920s  and  1930s,  survived  and  again  assumed  a  leadership  role  after  redemocratization.  Their  strength  is  due  to  longstanding  loyalty on the part of voters and card‐carrying members, as well as the discipline  of  backbenchers.  This  discipline  derives  from  the  electoral  system—closed‐list  proportional representation in Argentina, two‐member (“binominal”) districts in  Chile—and  is  reinforced  by  tradition.  The  usual  penalty  for  congressmen  who  vote  systematically  against  the  party  line  is  removal  from  the  list  at  the  next  election  or  expulsion  before  it.  Given  the  weight  of  tradition  and  the  relative  concentration  of  votes  for  the  larger  parties,  the  chances  of  reelection  for  those  who leave or are expelled are slim.   We  Brazilians  often  imagine  that  fewer  and  more  united  parties  would  facilitate  negotiations  between  the  president  and  Congress,  and  assure  a  faster,  more  consistent  decision‐making  process.  Our  neighbors’  experience  suggests  that  may  not  always  be  the  case.  United  and  pugnacious  parties  may  be  a  synonym  for  governability  under  parliamentarism.  Under  presidentialism  they  sometimes  serve  to  organize  gridlock.  Polarization  between  the  PJ  and  UCR  in  Argentina,  and  exacerbated  rivalry  between  right‐wing,  centrist,  and  left‐wing  blocs in Chile, set the stage for the collapse of democracy in both countries.   Polarization  persisted  in  post‐authoritarian  Argentina;  it  did  not  reach  breaking‐point  but  severely  hampered  both  UCR‐led  administrations.  The                                                           For  analyses  that  emphasize  possibilities  for  executive‐legislative  cooperation,  despite  the  conflict,  see  Scott  Morgenstern  and  Benito  Nacif,  eds.,  Legislative  Politics  in  Latin  America,  Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002. 

22

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

19

  intransigence  of  the  Peronist  opposition  and  galloping  inflation  led  President  Alfonsín to resign months before the official end of his term. President Fernando  de  la  Rúa,  who  succeeded  Menem,  failed  to  complete  a  year  in  office.  His  government  was  stymied  by  its  inability  to  halt  or  manage  the  crisis  of  confidence in the peso’s parity with the dollar. In response to popular rejection of  all politicians (¡Que se vayan todos!), the UDR broke up and shrank while the PJ,  despite  electoral  damage,  strengthened  its  relative  predominance,  sustained  by  the  Peronist  party‐union  machine  and  its  symbolic  identification  with  the  descamisados.23  Argentina  thus  appears  to  be  shifting  away  from  a  virtual  two‐ party system to a pluriparty system with a dominant party, in which executive‐ legislative relations will tend to oscillate between cooperation and confrontation  depending on whether the president is a Peronist.  Argentina’s  military  junta  departed  the  scene  without  leaving  anyone  to  claim  a  political  legacy.  Pinochet’s  legacy,  in  contrast,  was  recognized  until  the  end of his life by the right‐wing UDI and RN, which have consistent social and  electoral grassroots. This led to an alliance of the center and left represented by  the PDC and PS. The unstable triangle of the past was thus replaced by a sort of  virtuous  circle  in  which  the  Concertación’s  political  consistency  and  economic  success reinforce each other, assuring control of both the executive and Congress.   Mexico’s  transition  to  pluralist  democracy  is  a  case  apart  in  this  mosaic:  somewhat of a Latin American perestroika, in which a semi‐authoritarian regime  opened up from the inside out and from the top down in a process led by those  who  were  both  head  of  government  and  head  of  the  almost  single  party.  This  concentration  of  power  enabled  Presidents  Miguel  de  la  Madrid  (1982–88)  and  Carlos  Salinas  de  Gortari  (1988–94)  to  overcome  the  Partido  Revolucionario  Institucional’s  (PRI)  deep‐seated  national  statism  and  implement  the  economic  reforms  that  paved  the  way  for  Mexico  to  join  the  North  American  Free  Trade  Agreement in  January  1994.  Successive electoral reforms  since  1978 enabled the  opposition to strengthen its representation in the lower house from 17 percent of  seats  to  48  percent  in  1988  and  52  percent  in  1997,  leaving  President  Ernesto  Zedillo  (1994–2000)  with  a  minority  in  Congress  in  the  second  half  of  his  term.  The  2000  presidential  election  brought  the  democratic  routine  of  party  alternation and made Mexico a member of the club of presidents in doble minoria.  Partido  Acción  Nacional  (PAN)  candidate  Vicente  Fox  was  elected  president  (2000–06) with 48 percent of the votes and failed to win congressional approval  for his main fiscal, energy and labor reforms.   The  PRI’s  hegemony  for  more  than  70  years  forged  a  peculiar  mechanism  whereby  the  party  controlled  its  representatives:  prohibition  of  reelection  to  Congress.  Without  the  possibility  of  a  second  consecutive  term,  congressmen  depended  on  the  party  for  access  to  other  elective  offices  or  political  appointments.  Far  from  questioning  this  legacy  the  PAN  and  Partido  de  la                                                          Juan Carlos Torre, “A crise da representação partidária na Argentina,” in Brasílio Sallum Jr., ed.,  op. cit., Chap. 4.  23

20

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  Revolución Democrática (PRD), which grew in the electoral soil lost by the PRI,  used it to increase the power of their national leaderships. One wonders whether  this party setup will lead to negotiating and coalition practices similar to those of  today’s  Chile  or  to  a  three‐sided  tug  of  war  more  like  that  of  Chile  before  Pinochet.   Unique to Brazil: Strong Congress, Weak Parties The  iron  law  of  what  in  Brazil  has  been  called  “coalition  presidentialism”  says  that to maintain a stable majority in Congress the president must share power in  the executive sphere by appointing representatives of allied parties to seats in the  cabinet and other positions.24  If  power  sharing  safeguards  the  president,  other  political  actors,  and  the  nation  from  the  unforeseeable  consequences  of  an  impasse  between  president  and  Congress,  it  does  not  in  itself  guarantee  the  support  of  a  majority  in  Congress for the legislative measures proposed by the Executive. This has to be  won vote by vote, bill by bill, in a Sysiphean labor for the president and his inner  circle—within which the function of “political coordinator,” normally performed  by  a  minister  with  an  office  in  the  presidential  palace,  stands  out  as  a  high‐ turnover job.   The key problem here is that except for the so‐called left‐wing parties, from  the variants of communist origin to the Partido dos Trabalhadores (PT), Brazilian  parties have little control over how their elected members vote in Congress.   Although  some people insist  on seeing our  parties  through  European eyes,  Brazilian  society  is  entirely  different.  It  has  less  hierarchy,  more  mobility,  far  fewer stable reference points. Ideologies are too weak to define behavior. Under  the  dictatorship  there  was  a  straightforward  alternative:  some  supported  the  regime,  others  fought  for  democracy.  In  a  free  country  other  choices  are  available.  At  the  same  time,  however,  there  is  less  difference  between  the  ideologies  professed  by  the  parties.  Their  platforms  are  very  similar,  and  unfortunately so are their practices.   Unlike  the  Argentine  and  Chilean  dictatorships,  the  Brazilian  military  kept  Congress open and shut down existing parties on two occasions: in 1965, when  they  imposed  a  two‐party  system,  and  in  1979,  when  they  abolished  it.  This  effectively  truncated  evolution  of  the  party  system.  The  Brazilian  dictatorship  itself did not leave behind an electorally competitive right‐wing party or bloc, as  did  the  Chilean,  and  this  in  turn  deprived  the  democratic  forces  of  a  common  adversary that could prevent them from dispersing. Several leaders and some of  the  old  parties  reappeared,  but  the  political  system  was  reorganized  on  a  different  basis:  first,  for  a  short  time,  it  revolved  around  the  PMDB;  more  recently, it has revolved around the polarization between the PT and PSDB.                                                            The  Brazilian  institutional  system  up  to  1964  was  first  characterized  as  “coalition  presidentialism”  by  Sérgio  Abranches  in  “Presidencialismo  de  Coalizão:  O  Dilema  Institucional  Brasileiro,” Dados 31(1), 1988, pp. 5–33.  24

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

21

  Moreover, we have an electoral system that tends to push party indiscipline  to  extremes.  The  existence  of  a  large  number  of  parties  is  a  typical  effect  of  proportional representation, particularly in a large heterogeneous federation like  Brazil. The weakness of the link between elected representatives and their parties  is characteristic of the open‐list PR system adopted in Brazil, where a candidate’s  position  on  a  party  list  depends  on  the  number  of  votes  he  or  she  receives  individually.   Adopted  in  the  1940s  when  Brazilian  society  was  still  predominantly  rural  with strongly oligarchic features, this system has long shown signs of fatigue. In  a  democratic  mass  society  with  whole  states  for  electoral  districts,  in  which  hundreds of candidates contest seats in the lower house, individually competing  for  tens  of  thousands  of  votes,  the  open‐list  system  has  become  a  game  of  roulette  in  which  the  “banker”—economic  power  and  influential  corporations  embedded  in  the  state  apparatus,  in  the  private  sector,  or  worse  still  in  the  interface between the two—always wins in the end. The rate of reelection to the  Chamber  of  Deputies  remains  low  at  50  percent  or  less,  but  the  high  turnover  does  not  mean  renewal  in  any  measurable  sense,  let  alone  improvements  in  quality.  Election  campaigns  are  growing  more  and  more  expensive.  A  congressman’s  chances  of  reelection  depend  less  and  less  on  whether  he  performs  his  duties  well  as  a  lawmaker  and  scrutinizer  of  the  government’s  actions, and more and more on how well he caters to local or sectoral clienteles.  This  makes  the  typical  congressman  a  representative  in  search  of  people  to  represent, that is, of new clienteles for whom he strives to cater via amendments  to  the  budget,  government  favors,  or  legal  advantages.  Thus  we  have  a  representative system in which “representation,” if any, is post‐electoral.   In  practice  this  form  of  relationship  between  congressmen,  parties,  and  the  electorate, as well as the executive, makes it difficult to characterize our system  of  government  with  precision.  How  can  one  properly  speak  of  “coalition  presidentialism”  when  the  fragmentation  of  interests  and  power  foci  overflows  party channels? The notion is useful but needs to be contextualized. It would be  greatly preferable to be able to organize stable party alliances and coalitions. In  fact, the “imperial” aspect of Brazilian presidentialism derives less from the will  of  the  president  than  from  the  effective  conditions  under  which  politics  functions.  Given  the  relative  weakness  of  the  parties  and  the  strength  of  Congress,  regardless  of  what  the  president  wants,  if  he  lacks  strength  then  clientelism and patronage (or fisiologismo, to use the popular term for the system  whereby  congressmen  lobby  for  material  and  political  public  resources)  predominate over the government’s capacity to define and implement a change  agenda for the nation.   Executive‐legislative  relations  become  much  more  volatile  in  the  context  of  this  type  of  representation.  This  is  why  attempts  at  building  an  “institutional”  relationship  between  president  and  parties  produce  precarious  results.  For  the  same reason political negotiations, however legitimate, are seen by the public as 

22

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  “horse  trading”  and “logrolling”:  they  are  conducted  almost  individually  or,  in  the case of “parliamentary fronts,” by caucuses comprising members of an array  of different parties, ranging for example from the PT to the PP, who join forces to  pursue  a  specific  goal,  such  as  farm  debt  relief,  opposition  to  the  easing  of  restrictions on abortion, or advocacy of parliamentarism.   Nevertheless,  with  all  its  delays,  peculiarities,  and  convolutions,  Congress  represents the interests and visions existing in society. It is up to the government  (and  especially  the  president)  to  understand  the  rules  of  the  democratic  game.  The  president  must  be  balanced  enough  to  realize  that  the  obstructions,  amendments,  and  feints  of  the  legislature  often  create  the  opportunity  for  understandings  that  produce  better  results.  Not  always,  of  course,  and  in  such  cases it is the president’s responsibility to put his foot down, in so far as the rules  of the game allow. And if even so the results are not forthcoming, then he must  go  back  to  public  opinion  and  persistently  defend  his  views.  This  is  why  in  a  democracy the battles are incessant and the improvements incremental.   Tension  is  inevitable  between  the  president’s  roles  as  representative  of  the  majority  of  the  nation  and  organizer  of  a  parliamentary  majority.  Without  alliances the president cannot govern. But neither can he govern, in the sense of  carrying out his agenda, if he “surrenders” to Congress.   Alliances  to  what  end?  Just  to  stay  in  power  or  to  achieve  broader  goals?  This question  must be  faced right at  the  start  of  his  term, when the parties  (the  president’s,  those  of  his  allies  or,  when  even  so  a  majority  cannot  be  assured,  those of his ex‐adversaries), sit down with a voracious appetite to discuss what  shares  they  will  each  have  in  the  spoils  of  power.  This  is  the  time  to  appoint  a  cabinet  and  leaders  in  Congress  (to  control  and  manage  the  lower  and  upper  houses  as  well  as  lead  the  coalition  caucus).  The  broader  goals  set  limits  to  the  concessions  the  president  may  make  to  allies  and  his  own  party.  If  he  is  not  capable  of  identifying  and  safeguarding  those  parts  of  the  executive  that  are  essential  to  the  accomplishment  of  his  projects,  he  may  end  up  appointing  the  wrong  people  to  key  positions.  In  our  case  the  economic  area,  including  ministries and federal financial institutions, and the most important portfolios in  the  social  area,  starting  with  health  and  education,  were  not  included  in  any  power‐sharing deals. Privatization of many large state‐owned enterprises (SOEs)  took out of the equation dozens of top executive positions that had traditionally  been part of these negotiations. The introduction of formal procedures to choose  regional and middle managers in social security, land reform, and environmental  protection, among others, had the same effect. Otherwise, even in positions open  to  nomination  by  allied  parties  it  proved  possible  to  match  political  criteria,  technical competence, and alignment with the government’s goals.   Members of the opposition and other critics of the government accused us of  subjecting  Congress  to  a  “steamroller,”  lubricated  by  handouts  of  jobs  and  budget allocations. In actual fact the scope for political appointments was made  narrower for the reasons given above, as was the scope for so‐called “parochial 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

23

  amendments”  after  the  scandal  involving  members  of  the  budget  committee  in  1993.  If  the  clientelistic  use  of  jobs  and  funds  were  the  key  to  assuring  a  pro‐ government  majority  in  Congress,  it  would  be  impossible  to  explain  how  we  enjoyed  broader  support  for  a  longer  time  to  pass  a  much  larger  and  more  complex reform agenda and with far fewer resources with which to bargain than  previous governments.   In  our  view  the  key  to  the  majority  was  none  of  the  above,  but  the  project  itself:  the  “mission”  legitimated  by  the  ballot  box  and  public  opinion,  and  in  whose  name  the  government  made  alliances  and  sought  backing  in  Congress.  Common sense suggests that the more the government asks of Congress in terms  of  lawmaking,  the  higher  the  price  it  must  be  prepared  to  pay  in  “retail”  negotiations with the parliamentarians who support it. Our experience suggests  the  contrary:  the  consistency  of  the  government’s  legislative  agenda,  with  its  overarching  commitment  to  “holding  on  tight  to  the  real,”  did  not  hinder  but  rather  facilitated  the  task  (in  itself  always  arduous)  of  keeping  the  extent  to  which  specific  demands  from  parties  and  allies  were  met  within  reasonable  limits.   Support from the street is no substitute for support from the parties. Without  stable  party  alliances it would  have  been hard for  the government to  overcome  the  1999  foreign‐exchange  crisis,  when  the  commitment  to  saving  the  real  seemed  momentarily  endangered  and  the  president’s  ratings  took  a  plunge.  A  combination  of  tactical  flexibility  to  negotiate  and  renegotiate  a  parliamentary  majority, and strategic obstinacy to pursue the key points of the reform agenda,  made  it  possible  to  traverse  the  inevitable  ups  and  downs  in  presidential  popularity  while  maintaining  both  the  majority  and  the  direction  of  the  government.25  Turning the Page on National-Statism The “mission” that legitimates the president’s actions is almost always couched  by the people in generic terms, although not necessarily vague ones: controlling  inflation,  eradicating  poverty,  creating  more  jobs,  combating  crime.  The  leader  must translate these diffuse expectations into a project, a sequence of actions that  consistently lead toward the desired  common  good. This  depends on  the scope  of his vision—his understanding of the country’s past and outlook on its future— and  his  ability  to  assemble  a  team  to  formulate  and  implement  concrete  measures in accordance with this vision.   Our  efforts  to  translate  the  mission  of  controlling  inflation  into  a  more  ambitious  reform  project  would  have  to  surmount  one  major  obstacle:  the                                                          See Eduardo Graeff, “The Flight of the Beetle: Party Politics and the Decision‐Making Process in  the Cardoso Government.” Paper presented to the V Congress of the Brazilian Studies Association,  Recife,  Brazil,  June  2000,  translated  by  Ted  Goertzel.  Available  at:  http://www.crab.rutgers.edu/~goertzel/flightofbeetle.htm. 

25

24

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  national‐statist  vision  with  which  Brazilian  culture  and  political  institutions  are  imbued, and a constellation of interests linked to that vision.   We  mentioned  above  the  relative  backwardness  of  this  discussion  among  Brazilian politicians. They were not alone in this respect. In Brazil, as elsewhere,  a  significant  number  of  intellectuals  remained  attached  to  a  basically  statist  vision—self‐labeled  left‐wing,  socialist,  nationalist,  or  progressive—even  after  the  collapse  of  the  Soviet  Union  and  the  acceleration  of  capitalist  globalization  had  resoundingly  discredited  statism.  Surprising  alliances  were  seen  between  these  fellow‐travelers.  In  discussions  on  fiscal  adjustment,  the  traditional  budgetary populism of those who advocate “spending now and the money will  turn up later” often resorted to the pseudo‐Keynesian arguments of economists  venerated by the left.   The  influence  sustained  by  national‐statism  in  Brazil  is  proportional  to  the  advances  it  claimed  in  the  last  century.  Brazil’s  economy  grew  more  than  any  other  between  1930  and  1980.  Industrialization  by  import  substitution  bequeathed an industrial base unrivaled in Latin America, vast, diversified, and,  as  became  clear  after  economic  opening,  reasonably  competitive.  Expansion  of  the  protected  domestic  market  sustained  levels  of  employment  at  a  time  of  explosive  demographic  and  urban  growth.  The  Vargas  state  extended  to  the  masses who had only recently flooded into the towns a precarious web of social  protection but one that was unprecedented and far better than the insecurity to  which they were exposed in the countryside.  Economic decline in the 1980s sapped the strength of the military regime but  confidence  in  the  old  form  of  the  state  and  its  economic  model  remained  unscathed. Most delegates  to the Constituent Assembly  (1987–88)  assumed that  democracy would be enough to put the national locomotive back on the rails of  development,  merely  adding  safeguards  for  individual  and  social  rights  to  the  pillars  of  the  autarkic  statist  economy.  (The  same  credo,  by  the  way,  was  expressed  by  Alfonsín  in  his  vibrant  inauguration  address  as  president  of  Argentina in 1983: “Con la democracia se come, se educa y se cura.”)   Besides  attachment  to  the  past,  alongside  special  interests  best  accommodated  under  the  mantle  of  state  protection,  what  fueled  the  resistance  to change was a lack of clear alternatives—an ideological fog that now shrouded,  now merged with the institutional obstacles to decision making. The alternatives  were  not  self‐evident  in  fact.  Unlike  Mexico,  Brazil  did  not  have  the  largest  capitalist  economy  in  the  world  on  its  doorstep  offering  purportedly  unlimited  possibilities  for  trade  and  industrial  integration  and  an  exit  for  surplus  labor.  Over  10  times  the  size  of  Chile,  it  could  not  afford  to  confine  itself  to  modernizing  and  diversifying  exports  of  primary  goods  to  secure  jobs  and  incomes  for  its  population.  Exports  of  manufactures,  in  which  the  military  regime invested with some success, took time to be recognized not as a mutually  exclusive alternative but as a complement to expansion of the domestic market.  

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

25

  In any event, a critique of the national‐statist vision matured in the five years  between  promulgation  of  the  Constitution  and  the  Real  Plan,  driven  by  shock  waves  from  the  fall  of  the  Berlin  wall  and  the  realization  that  advancing  information  technology  and  the  formation  of  regional  economic  blocs  had  opened  a  new  stage  of  global  capitalism.  Initially  waged  outside  the  political  system,  the  debate  among  specialists  (mainly  economists)  in  a  few  universities,  centers  of  excellence  belonging  to  the  federal  administration,  and  research  institutions linked to trade associations, gradually distilled a new vision of Brazil  and  its  place  in  the  world,  alongside  proposals  for  a  development  strategy  to  match the new reality. Collor embraced some of these proposals in the name of a  vague “modernity.” His meteoric passage shook the political world and created  more  room  for  discussion  of  the  reforms  in  the  media.  By  taking  presidential  intervention  in  politics  and  the  economy  to  the  ultimate  level,  he  may  actually  have  helped  to  convince  public  opinion  of  the  need  for  a  leader  who  without  retreating into a vision of the past would be capable of restoring confidence in a  less traumatic reform agenda.   When  the  gathering  inflation  crisis  after  Collor’s  impeachment  crossed  the  threshold of society’s tolerance and lowered resistance to change in Congress, a  sufficiently mature agenda was ready to be offered to the nation.  Our  thoughts  on  this  subject  had  advanced  during  the  Constituent  Assembly.  The  manifesto  of  the  PSDB,  founded  in  July  1988  by  a  group  of  dissidents  who  had  split  from  the  PMDB,  incorporated  many  of  the  new  ideas  we  would  try  to  put  into  practice  after  the  Real  Plan  was  launched:  less  protectionism  and  more  technological  development;  less  corporatism  and  more  permeability of the state to grassroots demands and participation. We criticized  both the dyed‐in‐the‐wool advocates of state monopoly and those who saw any  state  intervention  as  a  threat  to  the  market  economy.  Nationalization  versus  privatization, we warned, was a false problem when it was reduced to a matter  of principle  without  taking  into account  the limits and possibilities of state and  private action in each sector.   It was too late to try to dissuade the Constituent Assembly from bowing to  the  pressure  of  corporatist  and  national‐statist  opinions.  Later,  however,  when  the Real Plan opened a window of opportunity, the conversation with reformist  sectors  of  society  gave  us  both  the  intellectual  critical  mass  and  the  support  of  public opinion to move forward.   The  presence  of  a  hybrid  of  intellectual  and  politician  at  the  head  of  the  Finance  Ministry,  and  later  as  president,  helped  build  and  sustain  a  bridge  between the government, the parties, and Congress, on one hand, and reformist  groups in the universities, the technobureaucracy, and the business community,  on the other.   Once an alternative direction had been defined and the ideological fog had  been  dispersed,  resistance  to  change  came  to  the  fore,  led  by  a  battle‐hardened  minority  parliamentary  opposition  with  the  PT  at  its  core  and  an  important 

26

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  segment  of  the  labor  movement,  whose  main  constituency  was  among  public‐ sector workers in the state apparatus and SOEs.   The  debate  about  the  reforms  never  reached  the  point  of  causing  a  split  in  society.  When  it  became  apparent  that  this  could  happen,  the  government  preferred  to  limit  its  goals  rather  than  fueling  polarizations  that  might  undermine democracy itself. On several occasions, however, just before difficult  votes in Congress the president appealed publicly to the sectors favorable to the  government’s  proposals.  Not  in  order  to  force  Congress’s  hand  but  to  counterbalance adverse pressures and legitimate the aye votes that the majority  were disposed to cast—albeit without much enthusiasm, as in the case of pension  reform.   The interplay of presidential leadership, Congress, and organized sectors of  society  would  have  left  out  the  vast  majority  of  the  population  and  would  therefore have produced limited results if it had not been for the intervention of  another  fundamental  political  instance  in  today’s  world:  public  opinion  mediated and engendered by the mass media.   Brazil  is  a  country  with  proportionally  fewer  readers  than  most  but  with  vast numbers of people who watch television and listen to the radio—practically  the entire population, in fact. The supply of information from both sources, radio  and  television,  is  reasonably  pluralistic  and  independent.  The  political  strength  of the masses informed by the electronic media made itself felt for the first time  in the 1984 campaign for direct presidential elections (diretas‐já), which heralded  the  end  of  the  military  regime.  All  important  political  developments  since  then  have  evidenced  the  same  phenomenon,  from  the  indirect  election  of  Tancredo  Neves to the presidency, to the impeachment of Collor, from the Cruzado Plan to  the Real Plan, and including all the elections in between.   The  presence  of  this  diffuse  actor  profoundly  changes  the  ways  in  which  power  is  democratically  wielded.  It  is  not  enough  to  be  voted  into  office,  even  with tens of millions of votes, or to be vested with legal authority. Legitimation  of  decisions  requires  an  unremitting  effort  to  explain  the  reasons  for  them  and  convince  public  opinion.  We  made  intensive  use  of  the  media  to  explain  every  step  of  the  Real  Plan  and  the  reforms,  and  to  sustain  the  support  of  public  opinion.   Objective missteps—the abrupt floating of the exchange rate in January 1999,  above all, whose inflationary impact was absorbed but which impaired society’s  confidence in the government—and subjective difficulties to sustain our political  agenda  in  the  public  debate  cost  us  the  loss  of  the  2002  presidential  election.  Alternation in power, not desired by the outgoing group, evidently, but planned  and  conducted  with  serenity  by  the  incumbent  and  by  the  president‐elect,  proved  an  acid  test  not  only  for  the  consolidation  of  democracy  but  for  the  reform agenda itself.   Lula  surprised  foreign  investors,  the  nation,  and  most  of  his  own  party  by  exchanging  the  rhetoric  of  radical  opposition  to  the  “neoliberal  model”  for  an 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

27

  explicit  commitment,  maintained  until  today,  to  the  premises  of  stability  and  economic  openness.  He  also  maintained  the  fundamental  premise  of  political  stability  by  opting—also  against  the  PT’s  hegemonistic  impulses—for  a  broad  coalition  including  parties  in  the  center  and  on  the  right  in  order  to  assure  a  majority in Congress.   This  is  not  the  place  to  emphasize  the  differences  that  persist  between  the  poles symbolized by the PT and PSDB. The fact is that the political process has  somehow  reduced  the  intensity  of  those  differences.  No  longer  does  anyone  advocate demolishing one form of state and laying the foundations of another. In  practice this issue has been decided, although it still echoes in the public debate.  The  dispute  between  “monetarists”  and  “developmentalists,”  which  was  a  heated one inside our administration and has recently come to the fore, does not  call  into  question  concepts  such  as  privatization,  trade  liberalization,  or  fiscal  responsibility.  The  political  cost  of  specific  changes  in  these  areas  will  tend  to  diminish from now on. And at least in theory this makes room on the agenda for  other topics on which little progress has been made, such as the tax, judicial, and  electoral reforms.  

Opportunity, Passion, and Perspective  In complex societies change sometimes comes about through a “short circuit.” A  gesture,  a  strike,  an  emotional  shock,  or  a  galvanizing  proposal  can  trigger  a  chain reaction that leads to far deeper transformations than imagined or desired  at the outset. This also depends, of course, on the history of the demands, class  conflicts, ideological strife and frustrations, and so forth that existed beforehand.   This is what happened with the Real Plan. Tired of inflation and its negative  effects, Brazilian society saw the Real Plan as a solution and backed it against the  opinions of many people and many vested interests; and at certain times, against  a majority of bien‐pensants and leaders who claimed to “own” the masses.   “Responsible pragmatism,” however, does not explain the change. Without  leaders  who  can  present  a  perspective  accepted  as  valid  by  the  majority,  significant  transformations  do  not  happen  in  a  democratic  society.  And  that  acceptance  is  not  blindly  given.  There  has  to  be  a  democratic  pedagogy,  persuasion,  an  effort  to  “win  together”;  otherwise  the  traditional  order  prevails  over the forces of modernization and change.   The inflationary crisis opened the ears of society, including both influential  organized  sectors  and  the  unorganized  mass  of  voters,  to  proposals  for  change  that in other circumstances would have been ignored or rejected. The fact that a  leadership  was  there  with  the  ability  to  take  advantage  of  this  window  of  opportunity  was  ultimately  a  fortunate  accident.  Pressing  ahead  with  the  changes required much obstinacy and some art.  

28

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  Implementing  policy  is  a  collective  process.  We  insist  on  the  word  process.  The press, public opinion, Congress, and members of the government itself often  expect and even beg for an act, for a heroic gesture, that can rapidly resolve the  problems faced by the citizenry or cater to the interests of a group. The latter may  perhaps  be  catered  for  by  a  heroic  gesture,  but  not  the  interests  of  an  entire  nation.  That  depends  on  continuous  action  to  change  practices,  mindsets,  and  structures.   It  is  no  accident  that  reform  is  so  difficult  or  that  anyone  who  genuinely  desires change sometimes feels lonely. Structures resist change. Vested interests  oppose  them.  Having  a  dream  is  part  and  parcel  of  the  art  of  politics,  in  the  ancient  form  of  crystallized  ideology  or,  in  modern  times,  inspired  to  a  greater  extent by visions than by certainties. In any event, it is always necessary to have  goals  and  to  strive  to  achieve  them,  even  if  they  are  limited  to  holding  on  to  power for its own sake. And there is a permanent interplay between national and  international structures (parties, churches, labor unions, companies, multilateral  organizations,  civil  and  military  bureaucracies,  the  media),  on  one  hand,  and  movements,  proposals, and leaders on  the other, alongside a  continuous  search  for  ways  of  persuading  more  people  and  building  up  more  strength  to  achieve  one’s goals.   If  you  overlook  one  side,  whether  it  be  the  established  order,  albeit  antiquated or apparently fragile, or the forces that can lead to change, with their  proposals  and  working  toward  the  new,  albeit  based  on  the  old,  you  make  no  progress. How many times in our eagerness to pursue change are we obliged to  make  concessions  to  the  other  side?  When  the  journey  begins  there  are  no  certainties about who will win the wager. Political will and firmness in pursuing  the goal do not assure victory. The outcome will always depend on the actions of  many and the repercussions of the actions and desires of those in command.   How can a head of government, for example, promise to create this or that  number  of  jobs  if  neither  he  nor  his  government  controls  the  variables  of  economic  life?  Changes  in  technology,  capital  flows,  corporate  strategies,  and  a  huge  number  of  factors  directly  influence  the  level  of  employment,  often  dramatically  reducing  the  number  of  jobs  in  this  or  that  sector.  The  leader  can,  and evidently should, be committed to implementing ideas, adopting programs,  and  taking  measures  designed  to  improve  the  economic  situation  and  increase  employment, but he will be wrong to promise hard numbers.  Pragmatism  with  clearly  defined  goals  involves  a  calculation  and  a  wager.  The  calculation  relates  to  the  support  required  to  implement  the  government’s  overall  policy,  even  when  it  is  detrimental  to  specific  targets.  The  wager  has  to  do with the leader’s belief that he is capable of inducing (or, if necessary, forcing)  his allies, including the last‐minute ones, to accept the goals he has set.   The risk  of losing  control of the process or  of the government  betraying  its  commitments is permanent. It is a dangerous adventure, because even with the  best of intentions a mistaken wager can be made. Success depends on objective 

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

29

  conditions  as  well  as  dispositions  that  are  neither  defined  nor  limited  by  the  broader  circle  of  power  alone.  People  will  be  indifferent  to  the  will  and  motivation of the principals, and in certain circumstances even to their successes,  if the latter are not sufficiently broad and consistent to convince the majority.   In any event, politics is not just a continuation of war by other means, nor is  it  the  substitution  of  force  by  submission.  It  is  not  a  method  for  counting  and  separating the good from the bad. It is the art of persuading the “bad” to become  “good,”  or  at  least  to  act  as  if  they  were,  even  if  they  do  so  for  fear  of  the  consequences. It is the art of transforming enemies into adversaries, adversaries  possibly  into  allies.  When  cooptation  occurs  instead  of  persuasion  (by  different  means),  politics  is  replaced  by  bartering  between  petty  interests.  The  drama  is  that the borderline between greatness and perdition is very thin indeed.   To  practice  this  difficult  art  it  is  not  indispensable  to  have  an  academic  background  or  even  to  spend  many  hours  reading.  Several  noteworthy  leaders  have  had  neither.  But  a  certain  comprehension  of  history  is  a  great  help.  At  a  time  when  everything  is  “of  the  world,”  everything  is  global,  it  is  necessary  to  have  a  reasonable  vision  of  the  totality  and  to  be  capable  of  understanding  the  social  conditions  of  one’s  day  and  age,  in  order  to  be  able  to  exercise  effective  leadership, not to make tabula rasa of what others have done but to give a better  direction to what has come from the past and lay the foundations for what one  wants for the future.   It  also  helps  to  have  a  “persuadable”  temperament,  to  borrow  a  term  from  Jane  Austen.  Democracy  today  is  a  process  in  which  the  citizenry  want  to  participate not just by voting or even approving (in a referendum, for example),  but  also  by  deliberating.  Albert  Hirschman,  contradicting  the  tradition  that  values  vigorous  and  rigid  political  opinions,  has  stressed  the  importance  of  opinions  being  formed  not  before  but  during  the  process  of  discussion  and  deliberation.  Open  minds,  spirits  psychologically  more  inclined  to  convergence  and  compromise,  who  favor  dialogue,  among  both  leaders  and  led,  would  therefore be better suited to playing the democratic game on a long‐term basis.26   This shake‐up in today’s world has made Cicero highly relevant again, in his  praise  of  rhetoric  as  a  foundation  for  the  education  of  the  Prince.  For  him  the  noblest way of life is devotion to virtuous public service. Friendship among men,  good  will,  enables  good  government  to  be  grounded  in  the  free  cooperation  of  citizens. For these values to sustain the republic, there must be laws and people  must be persuaded of their validity, which in turn requires that the statesman be  capable  of  using  reason  and  emotion.  The  interplay  of  these  two  qualities  develops  through  what  was  called  “rhetoric,”  the  basis  for  persuasion.  Obedience  is  obtained  not  through  fear  and  coercion,  but  through  reason  and 

                                                         Albert  Hirschman,  “Opinionated  Opinions  and  Democracy,”  in  A  Propensity  to  Self‐Subversion,  Cambridge & London, Harvard University Press, 1995, pp. 77–84.  26

30

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

  love  built  upon  a  kind  of  Socratic  dialogue  and  embodying  the  apex  of  leadership.27  The word is the “message” in our time, and the means for its diffusion is no  longer  the  pulpit  or  tribune  but  the  electronic  media.  The  impact  of  radio,  and  later  television,  could  already  be  seen  in  the  “mass  politics”  that  characterized  Fascist and authoritarian mobilizations in general, and that served as cement for  Third World populism. Now it is democratic politics itself that appeals to these  media  and  the  Internet.  Everything  happens  in  real  time  regardless  of  physical  distance, but with a difference: the Internet is essentially interactive, and little by  little  radio,  TV,  and  even  newspapers  and  magazines  are  creating  democratic  spaces for “the other side,” for people’s reactions.   Everything is made easier when there are symbols that help people visualize  change.  Politics  deals  with  symbolic  content,  and  leaders  seek  to  exercise  the  modern form of what Gramsci called cultural hegemony, albeit with a different  connotation.  This  requires  an  “actor’s”  qualities,  although  these  cannot  be  dissociated from the individual’s prior experience.   In  the  interplay  between  symbolism  and  practical  achievements,  leaders  must  be  capable,  through  intuition  or  knowledge,  of  elaborating  and  transmitting  a  “vision”  of  the  problems  they  face,  a  vision  of  society  and  the  nation. In the case of politicians with a national following, given the framework  of globalization, they must have some feeling of world affairs. Statesmanship is  projecting the nation’s future, seeing it in the world context, and being capable of  leading it in that direction.   In  a  world  of  intercommunicating  messages  and  increasing  participation,  democratic  leaders,  albeit  conscious  of  class  conflicts  and  differences,  must  propose values that can be shared by a majority of society. Otherwise they lose  strength. Because their relationship with those they lead is not static, leaders will  attempt to persuade them all the time, running the risk of losing some of the time  but winning at other times. On those occasions when they win, they must strive  to  attract  more  and  more  people,  groups,  movements,  and  institutions  to  their  side. When they lose, they must try to find out why, to identify the mistakes they  made,  and  based  on  their  convictions  humbly  to  rebuild  the  widening  circle  of  persuasion that can lead to victory.   At  bottom,  the  capacity  to  symbolize  and  transmit  messages  is  identical  to  the  virtue  of  discerning  and  proposing  to  society  a  way  forward  that  is  acceptable  to  the  led,  albeit  temporarily.  In  an  interactive  society  this  “project”  cannot be conceived as an act of reason or will, but as a collective construction in  which certain people—the leaders—express more completely and symbolize for  a specific moment the movement of society, which is necessarily conditioned by  values, by cultural models, with which and upon which they act. Leaders either  point the way and blaze a trail or lose power.                                                           To  understand  the  topicality  of  Cicero,  see  Chapter  6  of  the  excellent  book  by  Gerard  B.  Wegemer, Thomas More on Statesmanship, Washington, Catholic University of America Press, 1996. 

27

Political Leadership and Economic Reform: The Brazilian Experience in the Context of Latin America

31

  But the personal attribute that is critical to the exercise of leadership, in the  new politics as in the old, is still courage. Because there comes a time when it is  indispensable  to  make  decisions  that  upset  a  lot  of  people.  It  will  even  be  necessary to make decisions almost alone, however “persuadable” one may be. A  leader  is  someone  who,  once  persuaded  that  an  important  decision  is  the  right  one to make, accepts only one attitude of himself: making the decision. However  hard  it  may  be,  he  takes  a  road  and  resolves  to  move  forward  on  it,  even  if  it  means being against everyone else, and persists until he wins, because what he  can see farther ahead shows him that this and not something else is what needs  to be done.   Max  Weber  despised  politicians  who  shrug  off  the  consequences  of  their  actions, blaming the pettiness of others or the world, cozily reliant on their own  clear  conscience  and  clean  hands.  Weber  reserved  his  respect  for  the  mature  person  (young  or old)  who  in  particular  circumstances decides, “I must do this  and  nothing  else,”  and  takes  responsibility  for  doing  so.  “That  is  something  genuinely  human  and  moving,”  he  says.  “In  so  far  as  this  is  true,  an  ethic  of  ultimate ends and an ethic of responsibility are not absolute contrasts but rather  supplements,  which  only  in  unison  constitute  a  genuine  man—a  man  who  can  have the ‘calling for politics’.”28   The  possibility  proposed  by  Weber  of  reconciling  pragmatism  with  ethical  values  and  limits  that  transcend  immediate  circumstances  is  encouraging  for  a  political leader in government who wonders, as we so often wondered, whether  he  will  be  capable  of  implementing  the  necessary  changes  with  the  necessary  speed by the meandering highways and byways of democracy.   Let  us  stay  with  Weber  for  our  conclusion:  “Politics  is  a  strong  and  slow  boring  of  hard  boards.  It  takes  both  passion  and  perspective.  Certainly  all  historical  experience confirms  the truth—that man would not  have attained  the  possible unless time and again he had reached out for the impossible. But to do  that a man must be a leader, and not only a leader but a hero as well, in a very  sober sense of the word. And even those who are neither leaders nor heroes must  arm  themselves  with  that  steadfastness  of  heart  which  can  brave  even  the  crumbling of all hopes.”   The  experience  of  Brazil,  like  that  of  other  important  countries  in  Latin  America, gives us reasons to keep alive our hopes of democratic reformism and  renewing its political agenda.  

                                                        Max Weber, “Politics as a Vocation”, in H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills (tr. and eds.), From Max  Weber:  Essays  in  Sociology,  Oxford  University  Press,  USA,  1958,  Chap.  4,  p.  127.  [Ensaios  de  Sociologia, Rio de Janeiro, Zahar, 1963, cap. 4, p. 151, tradução de Waltensir Dutra]  28

32

Fernando Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff

 

Liderança política e reformas  econômicas; a experiência brasileira  no contexto da América Latina  Fernando Henrique Cardoso  Eduardo Graeff 

Resumo  Este paper relata os progressos recentes feitos pelo Brasil no sentido de consolidar  a  democracia,  controlar  a  inflação  e  retomar  o  crescimento  econômico.  Com  a  objetividade  possivel,  levando  em  conta  a  participação  dos  autores  nos  acontecimentos, o relato busca reconhecer a importância e os limites da lideranca  politica  do  país  nesse  processo,  destacando  os  papéis  do  presidente  da  Republica,  dos  partidos  politicos,  do  Congresso  e  dos  meios  de  comunicação.  Referências  ocasionais  à  experiência  dos  vizinhos  Argentina,  Chile  e  México  servem para realçar as peculiaridades do Brasil no contexto da América Latina.    

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

33

 

 

Sumário  Resumo ............................................................................................................................33 Introdução ....................................................................................................................... 37 Da crise inflacionária à consolidação da estabilidade...............................................39 Os percalços e a força do reformismo democrático ..................................................48 Oportunidade, paixão e perspectiva ...........................................................................64      

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

35

 

 

Liderança política e reformas  econômicas; a experiência brasileira  no contexto da América Latina  Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff29 

Introdução  O Brasil cresceu em média 2,4% ao ano nos últimos 25 anos — um pouco menos  que  a  América  Latina,  bem  menos  que  o  mundo,  muito  menos  que  os  países  emergentes  da  Ásia  no  mesmo  período  e  que  o  próprio  Brasil  em  décadas  anteriores.  Se  algo  se  destaca  favoravelmente  na  experiência  brasileira  recente,  não  é  o  crescimento,  mas  antes  a  estabilização  e  a  abertura  bem  sucedida  da  economia. A isso devemos acrescentar uma conquista política: a democracia. Esta  foi,  na  verdade,  a  grande  causa  das  pessoas  e  grupos  que  se  sucederam  no  governo  do  país  desde  a  saída  dos  militares  em  1985.  Democracia,  mais  que  estabilidade  econômica  e  até  desenvolvimento —  supondo  que  uma  coisa  pudesse  ser  trocada  pela  outra.  Não  se  trata  de  objetivos  excludentes,  embora  regimes autoritários possam às vezes ostentar maiores taxas de expansão do PIB.  Para  o  Brasil,  como  para  outros  países  latino‐americanos,  os  três  se  apresentavam  como desafios indissociáveis no começo da década de 1990.  Supor  que  um  governante contemporâneo  pode  determinar  de  acordo  com  sua  vontade  o  ritmo  e  o  rumo  da  economia  nacional  é  tão  questionável  quanto  acreditar  que  um  comandante  inspirado  seja  por  si  só  capaz  de  conduzir  suas  tropas  à  vitória  no  campo  de  batalha.  Tolstoi,  em  Guerra  e  Paz,  zomba  dos  príncipes  e  generais  que  agiam  como  se  suas  atitudes,  palavras  e  resoluções  ditassem  os  rumos  da  história.  Sua  ironia  mais  ácida  vai  para  os  teóricos  militares  que  pretendem  extrair  leis  científicas  da  infinita  multiplicidade  dos  acontecimentos.  Eis  o  paradoxo,  segundo  ele:  “quanto  mais  alto  os  soldados  e  estadistas se encontram na pirâmide da autoridade, mais distantes estão de sua                                                           Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso,  ex‐presidente  do  Brasil  (1995‐2002),  é  atualmente  presidente  do  Instituto  Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso  (São  Paulo,  Brasil)  e  presidente  honorário  do  Partido  da  Social Democracia Brasileira (PSDB). É membro do Conselho Diretor do Clube de Madri (Madri) e,  nos Estados Unidos, da Clinton Global Initiative (Nova York, NY), do Conselho Diretor do Inter‐ American Dialogue, do World Resources Institute e do Instituto Thomas J. Watson Jr. Para Estudos  Internacionais da Brow University (Providence, RI). É autor de The Accidental President of Brazil — A  Memoir publicado (em inglês nos Estados Unidos) por Public Affairs Books (2006). Eduardo Graeff  é diretor do escritório de ligação de São Paulo em Brasília. Foi oficial de ligação congressional chefe  e Secretário Geral do Presidente do Brasil no governo de Fernando Henrique Cardoso (1995–2002).  29

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

37

  base, formada por aqueles homens e mulheres comuns cujas vidas constituem a  verdadeira  matéria  da  história”.30  Satélites  espiões,  mísseis  inteligentes  e  outros  prodígios tecnológicos podem ter dissipado (mas só até certo ponto) a “névoa da  guerra”. Os avanços da tecnologia da informação e da engenharia financeira têm  mostrado,  ao  contrário,  sua  imensa  capacidade  de  potencializar  a  imprevisibilidade  dos  mercados  em  dados  momentos.  Quem  teve  sob  sua  responsabilidade a mesa de câmbio do banco central de um país periférico numa  crise  mundial  sabe  como  pode  ser  extenuante  o  esforço  de  manter  a  calma  e  o  rumo nessa espécie de névoa num oceano revolto.  Sem mergulhar na discussão filosófica dos limites do livre arbítrio frente ao  curso da natureza e da história, reconheçamos que é quase impossível separar o  que decorreu de iniciativas dos governos locais daquilo que se impôs de fora nas  mudanças econômicas experimentadas pelo Brasil e países vizinhos. O segundo  choque do petróleo (1979) e o choque dos juros norte‐americanos (1982) lançaram  quase toda a América Latina numa década de estagnação e inflação, enquanto o  mundo  industrializado  reciclava  sua  economia.  A  busca  de  saídas  da  crise  respondeu,  como  não  poderia  deixar  de  ser,  às  novas  formas  de  atuação  dos  investidores, das empresas multinacionais, dos governos dos países centrais, das  agências econômicas multilaterais.  Isso  não  significa,  como  pareciam  supor  alguns  teóricos  da  economia  de  mercado, que existam receitas acabadas de desenvolvimento para abrir as portas  da  globalização  a  todos  os  países  que  se  disponham  a  “fazer  a  lição  de  casa”.  Nem  que  nós,  latino‐americanos,  estejamos  condenados  para  sempre  ao  subdesenvolvimento  ou  a  um  desenvolvimento  meramente  reflexo,  como  supunham os teóricos vulgares da dependência e ainda há quem acredite. O que  existe  são  percursos  históricos  específicos,  que  não  se  limitam  a  reproduzir  mecanicamente o “modelo” estrutural global.  Uma  análise  histórico‐estrutural  dessa  realidade  complexa  partiria  das  regras  de  funcionamento  da  economia  globalizada —  das  determinações  gerais,  abstratas,  no  linguajar  marxista —  para  reconstituir  como  elas  foram  experimentadas,  adaptadas  ou  transformadas  em  cada  grupo  relativamente  homogêneo de países periféricos. Assim se exporiam as relações dinâmicas entre  as  forças  sociais  locais  e  as  internacionais  e  veríamos  como  as  adaptações  e  inovações  na  forma  de  vinculação  de  cada  país  ou  grupo  de  países  à  economia  global deram resultados diferentes, embora sujeitos aos condicionantes gerais. A  moldura  das  transformações  é  dada  pela  globalização  e  pela  economia  da  informação. Entretanto, há várias maneiras para cada país se inserir nela ou dela  se  defender.  As  respostas  podem  ser  criativas,  umas  mais  vantajosas  do  que  outras. E cada uma depende tanto de circunstâncias dadas, como a localização do  país, sua população e dotação de recursos naturais, quanto de decisões políticas.  As sociedades nacionais possuem graus diversos de desenvolvimento econômico                                                           O  trecho  entre  aspas  e  o  sentido  das  referências  a  Tolstoi  são  de  Isahia  Berlin,  “The  Hedgehog  and the Fox”, in Russian Thinkers, Londres, Penguin Books, 1979, pp. 22–80.   30

38

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  e cultural, que propiciam melhores ou piores alternativas de adaptação às novas  circunstâncias.31  Nosso  objetivo  neste  paper  é  mais  modesto.  Limitamo‐nos  a  expor  nossa  visão particular dos esforços para consolidar a democracia, controlar a inflação e  retomar  o  crescimento  econômico  do  Brasil  no  passado  recente.  E  buscamos  refletir,  com  a  objetividade  possível,  sobre  os  limites  mas  também  sobre  a  relevância  da  ação  da  liderança  política  para  definir  rumos  e  contornar  obstáculos  nesse  processo.  Aqui  e  ali,  ao  longo  do  texto,  reportamo‐nos  à  experiência de outros países latino‐americanos, notadamente a Argentina, Chile  e  México,  não  com  pretensões  de  análise  comparada,  mas  para  apontar  contrastes  e  semelhanças  que  podem  iluminar  as  peculiaridades  do  caso  brasileiro e sugerir temas para uma troca mais ampla de experiências.32 

Da crise inflacionária à consolidação da estabilidade  A democracia na corrida de expectativas Em  outubro  de  2006,  Luiz  Inácio  Lula  da  Silva  foi  reeleito  Presidente  do  Brasil  em segundo turno por 60% dos votos válidos, depois de liderar o primeiro turno  com 49%, dez pontos à frente do segundo colocado. A reeleição foi a consagração  de um talento extraordinário de comunicador de massa a serviço de um símbolo  democrático — o migrante nordestino que se fez líder operário, fundador de um  partido  e  Presidente  da  República.  Para  o  eleitor  das  regiões  menos  desenvolvidas,  que  lhe  garantiu  a  vitória,  ela  foi  também  um  sinal  de  reconhecimento  às  políticas  de  alívio  da  pobreza  introduzidas  pelo  governo  anterior,  que  Lula  ampliou  e  converteu  em  lastro  material  de  sua  ligação  simbólica com os pobres. Ao mesmo tempo, significou uma renovação do apoio  algo  reticente  à  política  econômica  de  seu  primeiro  mandato,  que  frustrou  expectativas  de  aceleração  do  crescimento  mas  manteve  a  inflação  baixa  e  aprofundou  a  integração  do  Brasil  aos  fluxos  globais  de  finanças  e  comércio.  O  desafio  de  Lula  no  segundo  mandato  é  converter  as  mensagens  contraditórias  das urnas em ações de governo que reafirmem a crença, não no símbolo apenas,  mas  nas  instituições  democráticas  e  em  sua  capacidade  de  propiciar  ao  país  novos avanços sociais e econômicos sem abrir mão da estabilidade.  Há incertezas no horizonte, como sempre. Dúvidas sobre a sustentabilidade  a  longo  prazo  da  atual  política  de  juros  e  impostos  altos  e  câmbio  apreciado,  sobretudo  na  eventualidade  de  esgotamento  do  longo  ciclo  de  expansão  da                                                          Este foi o estilo da análise das “situações de dependência” na América Latina empreendida por  Enzo  Faletto  e  Fernando  Henrique  Cardoso  na  década  de  1960.  Ver  Dependency  and  develpment  in  Latin  America,  Berkeley,  University  of  California  Press,  1979,  traduzido  por  Marjory  Mattingly  Urquidi.  32  Nosso  relato  da  experiência  brasileira  de  estabilização  e  reformas  da  economia  baseia‐se  extensivamente em Fernando Henrique Cardoso, A Arte da Política; a história que vivi, Rio de Janeiro,  Civilização Brasileira, 2006.  31

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

39

  economia  global.  Dificuldade  de  continuar  financiando  o  aumento  dos  gastos  sociais  e  de  custeio  da  máquina  do  governo  mediante  elevação  da  carga  tributária,  corte  de  investimentos  e  expansão  da  dívida  interna.  Dissonância  entre os apelos do Presidente aos investidores privados e as tendências estatistas  de  boa  parte  de  sua  base  política.  Preocupação  com  o  desprestígio  geral  dos  políticos  depois  de  uma  série  de  escândalos  de  corrupção  envolvendo  altos  dirigentes do governo, seu partido e aliados no Congresso.  Nada disso parece perturbar a percepção da maioria dos brasileiros  que “o  país  está  andando direitinho”  [the  country  is  doing  all  right],  nas palavras de  um  jingle  da  campanha  de  Lula.  Longe  de  brilhantemente,  não  tão  bem  quanto  os  outros  países  em  desenvolvimento,  mas  “direitinho”.  Entenda‐se:  com  estabilidade  política  e  econômica  e  alguma  distribuição  de  renda  para  os  mais  pobres,  embora  com  perdas  da  classe  média.  A  avaliação  de  analistas  e  investidores locais e estrangeiros em geral também é positiva. Bancos e grandes  empresas  fecharam  2006  com  investimentos  modestos  mas  lucros  elevados.  No  começo  de  2007  a  inflação  projetada  era  em  torno  de  4%  ao  ano;  as  reservas  cambiais  aproximavam‐se  de  US$  100  bilhões,  para  importações  de  US$  91  milhões e uma dívida externa de US$ 192 bilhões; e o risco‐país ficava abaixo de  200 pontos, o menor desde que começou a ser calculado.  A situação do país nem de longe era tão favorável no começo da década de  1990.  Com  a  economia  estagnada,  a  dívida  externa  em  moratória  e  a  hiperinflação  batendo  à  porta,  as  esperanças  despertadas  pela  democratização  davam lugar à inquietação generalizada. Entre cientistas políticos, economistas e  outros  observadores,  o  diagnóstico  corrente  era  que  uma  combinação  de  idéias  anacrônicas,  instituições  defeituosas  e  falta  de  liderança  barrava  o  caminho  das  mudanças necessárias para o Brasil controlar a inflação e reencontrar o caminho  do crescimento. Enquanto setores da universidade, da tecnoburocracia estatal, do  empresariado  e  dos  meios  de  comunicação  discutiam  reformas,  o  nacional‐ estatismo que inspirara várias disposições de ordem econômica da Constituição  de  1988  continuava  pautando  as  opiniões  da  média  dos  políticos.  No  varejo  da  política, velhas práticas clientelistas e populistas rebrotavam como erva daninha  à  sombra  da  democracia.  Nas  grandes  decisões,  o  desenho  das  instituições  enfraquecia  os  partidos  e  minava  o  apoio  às  iniciativas  do  Presidente  no  Congresso,  ameaçando  reproduzir  o  padrão  de  conflito  Executivo‐Legislativo  que levara ao golpe de estado de 1964. O cenário que se desenhava era, se não de  ruptura  abrupta,  de  deterioração  lenta  da  democracia  por  falta  de  governabilidade.33  A literatura política chama “doble minoria” a situação, recorrente na América  Latina,  de  presidentes  em  dificuldade  para  governar  sem  respaldo  da  maioria                                                           São  representativas  dessa  visão  as  opiniões  de  especialistas  brasileiros  e  americanos  reunidos  pela Universidade de Miami e pela Fundação Getúlio Vargas no fim de 1991. Ver Siegfried Marks  (org.), Political constraints on Brazil’s economic development; Rio de Janeiro Conference edited proceedings  and papers, Miami, North‐South Center Press, 1993.  33

40

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  absoluta do eleitorado nem da maioria do Legislativo.34 A eleição em dois turnos  introduzida  pela  Constituição  de  1988  livrou  os  presidentes  brasileiros  do  primeiro problema. A fragmentação do sistema partidário os expôs intensamente  ao segundo. O PMDB, que aglutinara a oposição ao regime autoritário e elegera  uma ampla maioria do Congresso Constituinte em 1986, dividiu‐se sobre pontos  essenciais  do  debate  constitucional  e  sobre  o  apoio  ou  oposição  ao  presidente  José  Sarney.  A  vitória  de  Collor  de  Mello  na  eleição  presidencial  de  1989,  concorrendo  por  um  partido  praticamente  inexistente,  mostrou  o  desgaste  precoce  dos  partidos  que  haviam  conduzido  a  transição  para  a  democracia.  Na  eleição parlamentar de 1990, a representação do PMDB caiu para um quinto dos  deputados,  uma  tênue  maioria  relativa  entre  dezenove  partidos  que  ganharam  assento na Câmara.  A  condição  de  Presidente  em  minoria  no  Congresso  não  foi  problema  no  primeiro  ano  de  mandato  de  Collor,  no  auge  da  popularidade  diante  de  uma  legislatura  perto  do  fim.  No  segundo  ano,  quando  ele  acordou  para  a  necessidade  de  se  compor  com  os  partidos  numa  legislatura  recém‐eleita,  era  tarde.  Com  a  popularidade  consumida  pelo  fracasso  de  sua  política  antiinflacionária  e  por  graves  denúncias  de  corrupção,  a  falta  de  uma  base  parlamentar consistente custou‐lhe as condições de levar adiante suas propostas  de reforma e por fim, em dezembro de 1992, o próprio mandato.  Inflação  em  alta  e  governabilidade  em  baixa  pareciam  aprisionar  o  Brasil  numa armadilha que esgotava suas energias e inspirava prognósticos pessimistas  sobre  a  capacidade  da  democracia  de  ganhar  ou  pelo  menos  empatar  a  corrida  com as expectativas de progresso social e econômico que ela mesma suscitara.  O Plano Real O  caráter  maciço  mas  pacífico  das  manifestações  populares  contra  Collor  e  a  obediência ao devido processo legal em seu impeachment revigoraram a confiança  na democracia. O vice‐presidente Itamar Franco, um político experiente, assumiu  a  Presidência  e  formou  seu  gabinete  com  base numa  coalizão  partidária  ampla,  que lhe garantiu apoio estável no Congresso.  O ambiente econômico continuava se deteriorando, no entanto. A corrida de  preços e salários acelerava, realimentada pela indexação, privando as empresas e  o  governo  de  qualquer  referência  estável  de  valor  sobre  a  qual  basear  suas  decisões  de  médio  e  longo  prazo.  Os  investidores  mantinham‐se  retraídos,  embora os índices de rentabilidade e liquidez das empresas privadas fossem em  geral  positivos.  A  inflação  chegava  aos  30%  ao  mês  quando  o  presidente  Itamar  nomeou seu quarto ministro da Fazenda, em maio de 1993.  Como  se  isso  não  bastasse,  a  turbulência  política  estava  de  volta,  com  o  Congresso mergulhado num escândalo de corrupção na distribuição de recursos                                                          Ver Juan Lins e Arturo Valenzuela (orgs.), The Failure of Presidential Democracy: The Case of Latin  America, vol. 2, Baltimore, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.  34

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

41

  orçamentários  que  levaria  à  cassação  de  vários  deputados,  incluindo  o  líder  da  maioria.  É compreensível, nessas condições, que nossa promessa de atacar de frente o  flagelo da inflação tenha sido recebida com ceticismo, embora com boa vontade,  pela  mídia,  os  empresários,  a  maioria  do  Congresso  e  o  público  em  geral.  Com  um  Presidente  sem  respaldo  direto  das  urnas  (no  Brasil,  como  nos  Estados  Unidos,  o  candidato  a  vice‐presidente  não  é  votado)  e  o  Congresso  semiparalisado,  não  se  acreditava  que  houvesse  condições  políticas  para  travar  essa batalha. Nem tempo para vencê‐la, já que haveria eleições gerais em outubro  de  1994  e  a  eleição  presidencial  seria  antecipada  para  a  mesma  data  por  uma  emenda constitucional. Em pouco mais de um ano, a campanha eleitoral reteria  os  congressistas  em  suas  bases,  impossibilitando  a  aprovação  de  qualquer  medida legislativa complexa, que exigisse a presença da maioria em plenário.  O  que  o  Congresso,  o  Presidente  e  o  povo  prefeririam,  na  verdade,  era  congelamento  de  preços  ao  estilo  do  Plano  Cruzado,  que  em  1986  criara  uma  euforia  de  curta  duração  mas  de  grata  lembrança.  Analistas  acostumados  a  projetar  o  futuro  como  repetição  do  passado  previam  que  as  medidas  de  austeridade  fiscal  embutidas  no  Plano  FHC,  como  foi  chamado  inicialmente,  teriam o mesmo fim de propostas semelhantes nos governos Sarney e Collor: as  gavetas do Congresso ou da própria Presidência da República.  O  êxito  do  Plano  Real,  como  ficou  conhecido  mais  tarde,  e  o  ciclo  de  mudanças  por  ele  inaugurado  desmentiram  ou  pelo  menos  relativizaram  os  diagnósticos  que  enfatizavam  obstáculos  políticos  para  a  estabilização  da  economia e a realização de reformas no Brasil.  Mesmo  no  prazo  apertado  do  calendário  eleitoral,  foi  possível  reunir  no  Ministério  da  Fazenda  uma  equipe  técnica  experimentada  e  criativa —  apoio  indispensável  para  um  ministro  que  não  era  economista  –,  formular  uma  estratégia  inovadora  de  estabilização,  combinando  medidas  ortodoxas  e  heterodoxas,  e  conseguir  apoio  político  para  implementá‐la  –,  no  que  a  experiência anterior do ministro como congressista mostrou‐se valiosa.  A  política  fiscal  frouxa  minara  a  credibilidade  das  tentativas  anteriores  de  estabilização nos governos Sarney e Collor de Mello. A primeira etapa do Plano  Real foi um conjunto de medidas destinadas a cobrir esse flanco: cortes de gastos  no  orçamento  federal;  liberação parcial de  receitas que  a Constituição vinculara  automaticamente  a  determinadas  despesas;  um  novo  imposto  a  ser  arrecadado  pelos  bancos  sobre  qualquer  movimentação  financeira,  incluindo  o  desconto  de  cheques;  renegociação  das  dívidas  dos  estados,  vários  deles  havia  anos  em  situação  de  inadimplência  ou  perto  disso.  Embora  insuficientes  para  assegurar  equilíbrio fiscal a longo prazo, essas medidas foram apresentadas ao Presidente,  ao Congresso e ao país como um primeiro passo para atacar as causas estruturais  da  inflação.  O  governo,  ao  propô‐las,  deixava  claro  que  não  repetiria  a  desacreditada  terapia  dos  “choques”  antiinflacionários  heterodoxos  e  mostrava  determinação de dissolver o  casamento entre inflação e fazenda pública, que se 

42

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  tornara a marca registrada do regime fiscal brasileiro.35 O Congresso, ao aprová‐ las,  indicou  que  seria  possível  construir  consenso  em  torno  de  reformas  mais  amplas,  dando  aos  agentes  econômicos  um  sinal  positivo  sobre  as  chances  de  êxito  da  política  de  estabilização.  Esse  lastro  de  confiança  foi  reforçado  em  outubro de 1993, quando o Brasil, em negociação direta com os bancos credores e  apoio apenas informal do FMI, pôs fim à moratória da dívida externa.  Acreditávamos que medidas fiscais ortodoxas eram uma condição necessária  mas  não  suficiente  para  atacar  a  inflação  nas  alturas  a  que  chegara.  Num  dado  momento,  seria  preciso  desmontar  os  mecanismos  de  indexação  de  preços  e  salários  que  se  haviam  generalizado  na  década  de  1980  e  realimentavam  por  inércia o processo inflacionário, fazendo das taxas da inflação passada o piso da  inflação futura. O aspecto inovador e até certo ponto ousado dessa operação foi  radicalizar o uso da própria indexação como antídoto da indexação, lembrando o  “similia  similibus  curantur”  da  homeopatia.  Um  indexador  diário  que  introduzimos em fevereiro de 1994, a Unidade Real de Valor — URV, funcionou  como referência para ajustes espontâneos de contratos e preços antes da entrada  em circulação da nova moeda, dia 1º de julho. Isso evitou demandas judiciais de  agentes  privados  entre  si  e  com  o  estado  sobre  o  “descasamento”  de  direitos  e  obrigações  contratuais  antes  e  após  o  plano  de  estabilização.  Os  contenciosos  originados  em  planos anteriores  resultaram  numa  longa  fila  de  passivos  para  o  Tesouro  Nacional.  No  caso  do  Plano  Real,  um  único  dispositivo  foi  invalidado  pela  justiça,  com  conseqüências  comparativamente  pequenas.  A  blindagem  jurídica foi um elemento chave para a confiança no plano.  De 47% ao mês na véspera da troca de moeda, a inflação caiu para menos de  3% ao mês depois de trinta dias e tem se mantido na casa de um dígito ao ano.  As  primeiras  pesquisas  sobre  a  eleição  presidencial,  em  maio  de  1994,  apontavam  Lula  como  franco  favorito,  com  40%  das  intenções  de  voto.  Em  outubro,  ganhamos  a  eleição  no  primeiro  turno  com  mais  da  metade dos  votos  válidos.  A  esperança  despertada  pelo  Plano  Real  foi  a  grande  responsável  por  esse  resultado.  Foi  também  o  cimento  da  coalizão  partidária  pela  qual  concorremos, somando nosso PSDB a dois partidos de centro‐direita, PFL e PTB,  e  que  tratamos  de  ampliar  pelo  centro  depois  da  eleição  com  a  inclusão  do  PMDB.  Embora  nosso  programa  não  se  limitasse  a  esse  ponto,  consolidar  a  estabilização —  ou  “segurar  o  real”,  como  o  povo  traduziria —  tornou‐se  o  compromisso  básico  em  função  do  qual  nosso  governo  buscaria  apoio  no  Congresso e na sociedade e seria avaliado em última análise. 

                                                        A regra implícita desse casamento era que a expansão nominal das receitas e corrosão do valor  real  das  despesas  previstas  garantia  a  posteriori  o  equilíbrio  orçamentário,  ou  algo  parecido  com  isso, dispensando o governo e o Congresso do incômodo de negociar a priori prioridades e cortes  de despesa.  35

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

43

  Estabilização e reformas estruturais O controle da inflação não seria o fim mas o começo de uma agenda ambiciosa  de  mudanças,  como  alertamos  desde  o  início  o  país.  Tínhamos  noção  clara  do  rumo.  A  visão  geral  e  várias  medidas  específicas  dessa  agenda  estavam  esboçadas já nos documentos de elaboração do Plano Real.36 O caminho, porém,  se fez ao caminhar, com muitas pedras e curvas imprevistas.  O impacto inicial da estabilização dos preços sobre a renda dos assalariados  e da base da sociedade em geral antecipou o bônus e adiou o ônus das reformas  necessárias  para  consolidar  a  estabilidade.  Um  economista  neoclássico  nos  recomendaria  o  contrário:  antecipar  o  ônus  mantendo  a  expectativa  do  bônus.  Lembrando  a  lição  de  Maquiavel  sobre  o  risco  que  espreita  o  governante  reformista, vislumbrávamos nessa inversão da lógica econômica convencional a  oportunidade  política  de  manter  o  apoio  da  maioria  desorganizada  que  em  última análise ganharia com as reformas e neutralizar a resistência das minorias  bem  organizadas  e  influentes.  Não  ignorávamos  o  risco  do  “cansaço  das  reformas”. Apostávamos, porém, que o alívio com a queda da inflação aguçaria  na sociedade brasileira a percepção de suas mazelas seculares e as demandas por  mais  avanços.  Andaríamos  no  fio  da  navalha  entre  esses  dois  sentimentos  coletivos: o desatar das aspirações em função das mudanças que iniciávamos e a  frustração com o prazo e o custo para completar as mudanças.  Nosso  ponto  de  partida  era  a  convicção  de  que  o  quadro  de  superinflação,  desequilíbrio  fiscal,  endividamento  externo  e  estagnação  econômica  que  se  arrastava  desde  a  década  de  1980  sinalizava  o  fim  de  um  ciclo  de  desenvolvimento  do  Brasil,  sem  que  as  bases  de  outro  ciclo  estivessem  assentadas.  A  crise  tinha  causas  conjunturais  conhecidas,  partindo  dos  choques  externos do petróleo e dos juros e passando pelos erros e omissões de sucessivos  governos.  Mas  sua  causa  profunda  era  a  falência  do  estado  centralista  intervencionista  fundado  pela  ditadura  de  Getúlio  Vargas  (1937‐1945)  e  reforçado  pelos  governos  militares  (1964‐1985).  Depois  de  proporcionar  ao  país  cinqüenta anos de forte crescimento — mas também de concentração de renda e  marginalização  social  –,  esse  modelo  de  estado  esgotara  sua  capacidade  de  impulsionar  a  industrialização  via  empresas  estatais,  barreiras  protecionistas  e  subsídios ao setor privado.  Não haveria estabilidade econômica duradoura nem muito menos retomada  sustentada do crescimento, pensávamos, se o Brasil se mantivesse à margem dos  fluxos  internacionais  em  expansão  de  comércio,  investimento  e  tecnologia.  Apesar  da  crise,  muitas  empresas  brasileiras  haviam  conseguido  modernizar  seus  métodos  de  gestão  e  produção,  embora  nem  tanto  os  equipamentos.  Ao  contrário  do  setor  público,  as  empresas  privadas  não  estavam  excessivamente  endividadas. Mesmo surpreendidas pela abertura comercial abrupta promovida                                                           Ver  as  exposições  de  motivos  do  Plano  de  Ação  Imediata,  de  julho  de  1993,  e  da  medida  que  introduziu  o  real,  de  julho  de  1994.  Ambas  podem  ser  consultadas  nesta  página  do  site  do  Ministério da Fazenda: http://www.fazenda.gov.br/portugues/real/realhist.asp. 

36

44

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  pelo  governo  Collor,  mostravam‐se  em  geral  capazes  de  enfrentar  uma  maior  exposição à competição internacional.  Para  tornar  sua  economia  como  um  todo  mais  competitiva,  no  entanto,  o  país  precisava  de  outro  modelo  de  estado.  Nem  o  grande  protagonista  do  desenvolvimento,  como  no  passado,  nem  o  estado  mínimo  neoliberal,  mas  o  “estado  necessário”,  como  preferimos  chamá‐lo:  com  mais  cérebro  e  nervos  do  que massa burocrática para responder a tempo às oportunidades e turbulências  do  capitalismo  globalizado.  Mais  voltado  para  a  coordenação  e  regulação  da  iniciativa  privada  do  que  para  a  intervenção  direta  na  economia.  E,  não  menos  importante,  capaz  de  cumprir  as  promessas  da  democracia  na  área  social,  sem  jogar  sobre  os  ombros  dos  próprios  destinatários  dessas  promessas —  trabalhadores,  aposentados,  os  mais  pobres  em  geral —  o  peso  do  “imposto”  inflacionário.  Extensa  e  detalhista  ao  extremo,  a  Constituição  de  1988  era —  em  larga  medida  ainda  é —  uma  carta  contraditória.  Avançada  no  reconhecimento  dos  direitos e garantias fundamentais do cidadão, generosa na previsão dos direitos  sociais, nela também se entrincheiraram interesses especiais ligados às estruturas  do estado varguista, além de privilégios típicos do patrimonialismo arraigado na  cultura e nas instituições políticas brasileiras.  As  empresas  estatais  foram  contempladas  com  a  inclusão  no  texto  constitucional  do  monopólio  que  já  detinham  nos  setores  de  petróleo  e  telecomunicações.  Em  mineração  e  navegação  não  havia  monopólio  estatal  mas  foi estabelecida a exclusividade da exploração por empresas de capital nacional.  Conseqüência em ambos os casos: paralisação ou insuficiência dos investimentos.  Atraso dos investimentos também das empresas estatais de energia elétrica. Com  o  estado  em  plena  crise  fiscal,  seria  preciso  eliminar  ou  flexibilizar  as  vedações  constitucionais e definir regras para dividir com a iniciativa privada, incluindo o  capital  estrangeiro,  o  esforço  de  expansão  desses  setores,  sob  pena  de  ver  a  retomada do crescimento abortada por gargalos de infra‐estrutura.  Aos funcionários públicos a Constituição garantiu um regime previdenciário  altamente favorecido, tanto em termos dos requisitos de idade, tempo de serviço  e  contribuição  como  do  valor  das  aposentadorias.  Os  empregados  do  setor  privado  filiados  à  previdência  oficial,  embora  com  muito  menos  vantagens,  também  tiveram  benefícios  garantidos  ou/e  ampliados.  Com  o  aumento  das  despesas  correndo acima da  capacidade de geração  de  receitas,  os dois regimes  passaram a apresentar déficits crescentes que onerariam o conjunto da sociedade,  quer  pelo  aumento  da  carga  tributária,  quer  pela  inflação,  quer  pela  pressão  sobre a taxa de juros. Aumentos dos encargos sobre a folha de salários do setor  privado, medida paliativa para conter a expansão do déficit, levariam, por outro  lado,  ao  aumento  da  informalidade,  deixando  grande  parte  dos  trabalhadores  desprovida  de  proteção  previdenciária.  Cristalizou‐se  assim,  na  contramão  das  promessas  de  universalização  de  direitos,  um  sistema  previdenciário  altamente  estratificado, iníquo, além de insustentável a longo prazo. 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

45

  Os  funcionários  públicos  ainda  foram  beneficiados  pela  extensão  a  todos,  inclusive  ao  grande  número  de  contratados  sem  concurso,  de  garantias  de  emprego  vitalício  e  irredutibilidade  de  vencimentos  que  outros  países  normalmente  reservam  à  magistratura.  Isso  dificultava  qualquer  esforço  mais  ambicioso  de  modernização  da  administração,  além  de  tornar  praticamente  incontrolável  a  expansão  dos  gastos  com  pessoal  nos  três  níveis  de  governo —  federal, estadual e municipal.  Corrigir  essas  distorções  se  impunha  tanto  por  motivos  de  eficiência  como  de  eqüidade.  Foi  o  que  propusemos  por  meio  de  um  conjunto  de  emendas  aos  dispositivos  da  Constituição  sobre  monopólios  estatais,  definição  de  empresa  nacional,  previdência  social  e  serviço  público.  Submetidas  ao  Congresso  pouco  depois de inaugurado o governo em janeiro de 1995, a discussão e votação dessas  propostas  de  emenda  constitucional  ocuparam  todo  o  mandato  presidencial  de  1995  a  1998.  Sua  regulamentação  demorou  mais,  estendendo‐se  até  o  fim  do  nosso segundo período de governo, em 2002, no caso da reforma da previdência.  Batalha em várias frentes Para  o  público  em  geral,  a  discussão  sobre  reformas  se  confundiu  em  larga  medida com as marchas e contramarchas em torno das emendas constitucionais.  Na verdade elas foram uma parte importante, mas só uma parte das reformas do  estado levadas adiante nesses oito anos. A consolidação da estabilidade envolveu  esforços em várias frentes.  As  relações  financeiras —  e,  por  trás  delas,  o  equilíbrio  de  poder —  no  âmbito da Federação foram arduamente renegociadas até se chegar a um marco  legal  que  limitasse  o  endividamento  futuro  dos  estados  (além  de  algumas  prefeituras  de  médias  e  grandes  cidades),  induzisse‐os  a  ajustar  suas  contas  e  garantisse o pagamento das prestações das dívidas assumidas pela União. Nesse  processo,  vários  bancos  de  propriedade  dos  estados,  usados  pelos  respectivos  governos  para  a  emissão  descontrolada  de  dívida,  foram  fechados  ou  privatizados.  Os bancos privados sofreram com maior ou menor intensidade o impacto da  perda  dos  rendimentos  inflacionários  que  estavam  acostumados  a  auferir  sobre  depósitos não remunerados. Um programa de reestruturação e fortalecimento do  sistema  bancário  promoveu  a  troca  de  controle  de  instituições  fragilizadas,  limitando  os  prejuízos  dos  depositantes  e  principalmente  evitando  os  efeitos  devastadores  de  uma  quebra  em  cadeia.  As  instituições  financeiras  federais  também foram reestruturadas e capitalizadas.  O governo Collor havia removido a maior parte das barreiras não‐tarifárias e  reduzido as tarifas de importação. Com o real estável e apreciado em relação ao  dólar,  a  abertura  comercial  tornou‐se  um  fato.  Ao  contrário  do  que  muitos  previram,  isso  não  levou  ao  desmantelamento  do  parque  industrial  brasileiro.  Apesar  de  dificuldades  localizadas,  a  indústria  como  um  todo  reagiu  bem  à  abertura:  aproveitou  o  câmbio  favorável  para  importar  máquinas  e  insumos  de 

46

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  maior teor tecnológico, beneficiou‐se da expansão do mercado interno, manteve  basicamente o mesmo nível de complexidade e integração setorial.  O estado teve que fazer sua parte para apoiar a retomada do crescimento nas  novas condições decorrentes da abertura da economia.  O  Banco  Nacional  de  Desenvolvimento  Econômico  e  Social —  BNDES  expandiu  seus  desembolsos  cerca  de  cinco  vezes  entre  1994  e  1998,  para  um  patamar  acima  de  R$  20  bilhões  por  ano.  A  presença  de  uma  instituição  de  fomento  desse  porte,  sem  similar  em  países  emergentes,  foi  decisiva  para  a  reestruturação produtiva do setor privado.  Órgãos  governamentais  negligenciados  ou  inexistentes  numa  economia  fechada  tiveram  que  ser  fortalecidos  ou  implantados  em  áreas  como  promoção  das  exportações,  defesa  da  concorrência,  defesa  agropecuária,  propriedade  intelectual, apoio à inovação. Sua estruturação ajudou a preparar o terreno para a  forte  expansão  das  exportações  brasileiras,  tanto  de  commodities  como  de  manufaturados, a partir de 1999.  A  entrada  da  iniciativa  privada  nos  setores  de  infra‐estrutura  requereu  um  novo regime legal de concessão de serviços públicos e a criação de um ente até  então desconhecido na organização do estado brasileiro: as agências reguladoras  com  competência  legal  e  independência  política  para  zelar  pelos  direitos  dos  consumidores  diante  das  empresas  prestadoras  de  serviços.  Várias  dessas  agências  foram  criadas  na  esteira  da  regulamentação  das  emendas  constitucionais sobre petróleo, energia elétrica e telecomunicações.  O  real  nasceu  com  cotação  próxima  à  paridade  com  o  dólar,  mas  não  legalmente atrelado ao dólar como o peso argentino no Plano Cavallo (1991). Em  vez  da  dolarização,  insistimos  em  temas  pouco  atraentes,  como  o  combate  ao  déficit  público  e  a  busca  do  equilíbrio  fiscal.  Isso  teve  implicações  importantes  para a consolidação da estabilidade no Brasil. Sucessivas tentativas de realinhar o  câmbio  em  termos  mais  favoráveis  às  exportações  brasileiras  foram  abortadas  diante  das  crises  financeiras  externas  na  segunda  metade  da  década  de  1990.  Desvalorizações  graduais  do  real  em  relação  ao  dólar  até  o  fim  de  1998  não  acompanharam  a  inflação  doméstica.  O  realinhamento  acabou  acontecendo  “a  quente”  em  janeiro  de  1999,  quando  a  ameaça  de  esgotamento  das  reservas  externas  sob  um  forte  ataque  especulativo  ao  real  forçou  o  Banco  Central  brasileiro  a  deixar  o  câmbio  flutuar.  Ao  contrário  do  que  se  temia,  não  houve  crise  bancária  nem  disparada  da  inflação.  As  mudanças  estruturais  feitas  até  então,  embora  incompletas  do  nosso  ponto  de  vista,  mostraram‐se  suficientes  para estabilizar a economia sem “âncora cambial”.  A  luta  para  enquadrar  estados,  municípios  e  a  própria  União  na  busca  da  sustentabilidade fiscal intensificou‐se a partir da introdução do câmbio flutuante  e de uma política de metas de inflação em 1999. Como coroamento desse esforço  no plano normativo, em maio de 2000 foi aprovada uma Lei de Responsabilidade  Fiscal, aplicável aos três níveis de governo, com critérios estritos para a assunção  de dívidas e a criação de despesas com pessoal e outros encargos permanentes. 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

47

  Por fim, mas não menos importante, foi preciso redesenhar instrumentos de  ação do estado para fazer frente às promessas de universalização de direitos na  área  social.  Também  por  emendas  constitucionais,  foram  estabelecidas  novas  regras  de  participação  da  União,  estados  e  municípios  no  financiamento  do  ensino  fundamental  e  da  atenção  à  saúde  e  criado  um  Fundo  de  Combate  à  Pobreza.  Os  critérios  de  aplicação  desses  recursos  representaram  um  passo  adiante no sentido da eqüidade do gasto público, beneficiando prioritariamente  as  camadas  mais  pobres  e  vulneráveis  da  população,  tradicionalmente  mal  aquinhoadas  na  distribuição  dos  benefícios  dos  programas  sociais.  Um  amplo  conjunto de mudanças na concepção e execução dos programas essenciais nessas  áreas  proporcionou  avanços  em  relação  à  eficiência  do  gasto,  com  ênfase  na  descentralização dos recursos e ações da União para os estados e municípios, nas  parcerias com a sociedade civil e na avaliação sistemática dos resultados finais.  Nem  todas  as  reformas  avançaram  tanto  quanto  gostaríamos.  Não  temos  o  distanciamento  necessário  para  julgar  seus  acertos  e  erros,  nem  podemos  garantir que elas tenham alcançado o ponto de não‐retorno. Parece inegável que  elas  concorreram  para  sustentar  a  estabilidade  da  economia  brasileira  por  mais  de  doze  anos,  a  esta  altura.  Se  serviram  também  para  desenhar  os  contornos  definitivos  de  um  novo  modelo  de  desenvolvimento  do  país,  como  queríamos,  talvez seja cedo para afirmar.37 

Os percalços e a força do reformismo democrático  Democracia plebiscitária ou consensual? As  formulações  modernas  da  noção  de  liderança  política  enfatizam  a  posição  institucional  e  a  “missão”.  Fora  desse  contexto,  a  discussão  das  motivações  e  atributos  pessoais  do  líder  cai  na  banalidade  das  generalizações  psicológicas  e  até  biológicas.38  Nossa  reflexão  sobre  o  papel  da  liderança  no  processo  de  reformas  parte  dessas  duas  dimensões.  Tratando‐se  de  um  chefe  de  governo  democrático,  sua  posição  é  definida  basicamente  pela  divisão  dos  poderes;  e  a  “missão”,  pelas  expectativas  dos  liderados  na  tripla  condição  de  cidadãos‐ eleitores, vozes da opinião pública e membros de setores sociais organizados.  Comecemos  pelas  relações  com  o  Congresso  e  os  partidos,  que  são  críticas  para  as  condições  de  liderança  do  Presidente  da  República  no  Brasil,  como  nos  demais sistemas presidenciais da América Latina.                                                           Mauricio  Font  fala  em  “realinhamento  estrutural”  referindo‐se  ao  saldo  das  transformações  do  Brasil  nesse  período.  Ver  Transforming  Brazil;  a  reform  era  in  perspective,  Lanham,  MD,  Rowman  &  Littlefield,  2003.  Para  um  balanço  das  reformas  por  especialistas  brasileiros,  alguns  deles  participantes  ativos  da  sua  realização,  consultar  Fabio  Giambiagi,  José  Guilherme  Reis  e  André  Urani (orgs.), Reformas no Brasil: balanço e agenda, Rio de Janeiro, Nova Fronteira, 2004  38  Ver  Orazio  M.  Petracca,  “Liderança”,  in  Norberto  Bobbio  e  outros,  Dicionário  de  Política,  São  Paulo, Editora UnB e Imprensa Oficial do Estado de São Paulo, 2004, pp. 713‐716.  37

48

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  Nossa agenda de reformas foi extensa, complexa e — cabe insistir — ocupou  intensamente a pauta do Congresso Nacional. Ao todo, a Constituição sofreu 35  emendas  entre  1995  e  2002;  36  se  for  considerada  a  emenda  que  possibilitou  o  ajuste  fiscal  preparatório  ao  Plano  Real  em  1993.39  Cada  uma  delas  requereu  a  aprovação  de  3/5  da  Câmara  dos  Deputados  e  do  Senado,  em  dois  turno  de  votação  em  cada  casa.  Como  o  regimento  da  Câmara  permitia  (ainda  permite,  dentro de certos limites) a qualquer partido requerer a votação em separado de  partes de um projeto de lei, o quorum qualificado de 3/5 teve que ser alcançado  em  centenas  de  votações.  Mais  de  500  leis  complementares,  leis  ordinárias  e  medidas provisórias de alguma relevância foram aprovadas no mesmo período.  Dificilmente  as  reformas  terão  envolvido  um  esforço  tão  grande  de  construção  de  consenso  com  o  Legislativo  em  algum  outro  país  da  América  Latina.  Isso  representou  uma  desvantagem?  Considerando  a  distância  entre  o  que  queríamos  e  o  que  conseguimos  realizar,  a  resposta  poderia  ser:  sim,  a  necessidade de negociar passo a passo com o Congresso e os setores sociais nele  representados  comprometeu  em  alguma  medida  a  velocidade  e  o  alcance  das  mudanças  que  propúnhamos.  Mas  democracia  e  eficiência  econômica  não  são  objetivos permutáveis do nosso ponto de vista, como assinalamos de início. Nem  nos  parece  que  o  Brasil  tenha  se  saído  pior  que  países  vizinhos  que  fizeram  reformas pela via autoritária.  O Chile do general Augusto Pinochet (1973‐1990) é sempre lembrado como  exemplo  de  reformas  bem  sucedidas  impostas  sem  ouvir  o  Congresso —  fechado —  nem  a  sociedade,  ou  pelo  menos  suas  camadas  populares —  silenciadas  pela  dura  repressão.  A  ditadura  teria  sido  o  mal  necessário  para  colocar  a  economia  chilena  na  “trajetória  correta  de  crescimento”  do  ponto  de  vista  liberal,  incluindo  desregulamentação,  privatização,  abertura  externa  e  equilíbrio fiscal. Essa visão subestima o preço pago pelo povo chileno, não só em  termos de perda de liberdades e direitos, mas de privação material. Um choque  ortodoxo  contra  a  inflação  causou  recessão  de  mais  de  11%  em  1975.  A  crise  financeira  que  obrigou  a  desvalorizar  o  peso  (os  “Chicago  boys”  de  Pinochet  também  recorreram  à  âncora  cambial)  provocou  outra  recessão  profunda  em  1982. O desemprego foi a quase 20% e só caiu abaixo de 10% no fim da década de  1980.40  A  população  abaixo  da  linha  de  pobreza  chegou  a  45%  em  1985;  atualmente  está  de  volta  ao  patamar  do  fim  da  década  de  1960,  em  torno  de  17%.41                                                           O  texto  da  Constituição  brasileira,  incluindo  todas  as  emendas  até  o  presente,  pode  ser  consultado  na  seguinte  página  web  da  Presidência  da  República:  http://www.planalto.gov.br/ccivil_03/Constituicao/Constitui%E7ao.htm.  40  Se  outra  fonte  não  for  citada,  os  dados  sobre  PIB,  desemprego  e  inflação  de  diferentes  países  latino‐americanos são do Banco Mundial, compilados para este trabalho por Juliana Wenceslau, do  staff do banco em Brasília.  41 Cf. Dagmar Racynski e Claudia Serrano, “Las políticas y estrategias de desarrollo social. Aportes  de los años 90 y desafíos futuros”, in Patrício Meller (org.), La Paradoja Aparente; Equidad y Eficiencia:  Resolviendo el dilema, Santiago de Chile, Aguilar Chilena, 2005, p. 259‐260.  39

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

49

  Tampouco  se  pode  dizer  que  a  Concertación  por  la  Democracia  teve  sorte  de  receber  a  casa  arrumada  em  1990.  A  inflação  foi  de  17%  no  último  ano  de  Pinochet e só baixou para um dígito em 1995. Na verdade a Concertación manteve  os princípios de desregulamentação, privatização e abertura da economia mas foi  mais  rigorosa  na  política  fiscal,  ao  mesmo  tempo  em  que  restabeleceu  direitos  trabalhistas  e  investiu  fortemente  nas  políticas  sociais.42  E  o  fez  pela  via  da  construção  de  consenso  no  Congresso  e  com  os  setores  organizados  da  sociedade,  a  despeito  dos  recursos  discricionários  que  a  Constituição  hiper‐ presidencialista confere ao Executivo.43 O PIB chileno cresceu em média 5,5% ao  ano  entre  1990  e  2004,  nos  governos  da  Concertación,  contra  apenas  3,1%  entre  1974  e  1989.44  Se  o  Chile  se  destaca  na  América  Latina  como  um  caso  bem  sucedido de integração à economia global, não foi graças à herança da ditadura  mas  ao  que  suas  lideranças  democráticas  foram  capazes  de  realizar  deixando  para trás essa herança.  Na Argentina, a Junta Militar  que  tomou  o  poder  em 1976 tentou  reformas  liberais  semelhantes  às  chilenas  pela  mesma  via  autoritária,  com  resultados  catastróficos,  até  que  o  fiasco  na  Guerra  das  Malvinas  tornou  inevitável  a  devolução  do  poder  aos  civis  em  1983.  O  presidente  Raúl  Alfonsín  (1983‐1989)  recebeu uma economia em recessão profunda havia dois anos e a inflação acima  de 300%.  Diferentemente  do  Chile,  as  lideranças  democráticas  da  Argentina  tiveram  dificuldade  para  estabelecer  consenso  duradouro  sobre  os  rumos  da  economia.  Propostas de reforma de Alfonsín esbarraram na oposição peronista e na falta de  apoio  de  seu  próprio  partido,  a  UCR.  Uma  tentativa  de  congelamento  com  o  Plano  Austral  terminou  em  mais  recessão  e  inflação  acima  de  600%  em  1985,  o  que  abriu  caminho  para  a  volta  do  peronismo  ao  governo  com  o  presidente  Carlos  Menem  (1989‐1999).  Em  1991,  com  a  hiperinflação  batendo  à  porta,  Menem conseguiu arrancar do PJ e da oposição apoio ao plano de estabilização  do ministro Domingo Cavallo, que além da fixação por lei da paridade do peso  ao  dólar  incluiu  um  processo  acelerado  de  privatização.  Em  1992,  o  Pacto  dos  Olivos,  entre  peronistas  e  radicais,  possibilitou  a  convocação  de  uma  Constituinte que introduziu algumas das reformas propostas anteriormente por  Alfonsín.  Mas  o  instrumento  preferencial  de  implementação  da  política  econômica  de  Menem,  incluindo  a  privatização,  desregulamentação  e  o  que  houve  de  enxugamento  da  máquina  estatal,  foi  a  delegação  legislativa  ao 

                                                        Para um balanço detalhado das orientações e resultados dos governos da Concertación nos planos  econômico e social, cotejando com a herança da ditadura, ver Patrício Meller (org.), op. cit..  43 Ver a respeito Peter M. Siavelis, The President and Congress in postauthoritarian Chile; institutional  constraints to democratic consolidation, University Park, PA, The Pennsylvania State University, 2000.  44  Cf.  Oscar  Landerretche  M.,  “Construyendo  solvencia  fiscal:  el  éxito  macroeconómico  de  la  Concertación”, in Meller, op. cit., pp. 83‐137.  42

50

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  Executivo,  dispensando‐o  de  negociar  suas  medidas  ponto  por  ponto  com  o  Congresso.45  Sem  deixar  de  ser  democrática,  a  via  para  as  reformas  da  Argentina  de  Menem  parece  ter  um  componente  plebiscitário  acentuado,  em  que  a  crise  inflacionária predispôs os partidos e a sociedade a aceitar medidas “heróicas” e  concentrou a iniciativa nas mãos do Presidente da República. Em comparação, as  experiências  do  Chile  e  do  Brasil  situam‐se  mais  nitidamente  no  campo  da  “democracia consensual”, em que o Executivo tem que negociar e transigir com  os grupos que mantêm algum poder de veto às suas propostas.46  Mais  rápido  à  primeira  vista,  o  atalho  argentino  para  a  estabilização  não  chegou tão longe em termos de reformas estruturais e, ao fim e ao cabo, parece  ter resultado em instituições mais débeis e não mais fortes, como se evidenciou  na crise cambial e financeira de 2001‐2002. O tortuoso caminho da construção de  consenso  levou  o  Chile  e  o  Brasil  a  resultados  mais  sólidos  do  ponto  de  vista  institucional.  Com  uma  diferença  relevante  entre  os  dois  países:  enquanto  a  agenda  da  Concertación  foi,  talvez,  basicamente  de  reconstrução  de  instituições  sociais e políticas democráticas sobre a terra arrasada pela ditadura, as reformas  brasileiras  trataram  ao  mesmo  tempo  da  construção  de  novas  instituições  e  da  remoção  dos  escombros  do  velho  estado  varguista,  a  um  custo  político  possivelmente mais alto.  A falácia das pré-condições políticas A  crise  inflacionária  também  funcionou  como  “parteira  da  história”  no  Brasil.  Com  preços  subindo  quase  todo  dia  e  acumulando  aumentos  médios  acima  de  20%  ao  mês,  praticamente  não  havia  setores  imunes  ao  ônus  da  superinflação.  Todos  eram  de  algum  modo  impactados:  os  assalariados,  aposentados  e  pensionistas  pela  corrosão  acelerada  do  poder  de  compra  de  seus  rendimentos  fixos;  os  trabalhadores  por  conta  própria  e  micro‐empresários  sem  acesso  ao  sistema bancário pela desvalorização de seus escassos ativos em dinheiro; a alta  classe média e os empresários pelas imensas dificuldades de calcular, planejar e  investir  no  ambiente  superinflacionário,  mesmo  tendo  acesso  a  aplicações  financeiras  indexadas.  Isso  multiplicava  o  apoio  potencial  a  qualquer  proposta  plausível  para  controlar  a  inflação,  na  mesma  medida  em  que  diminuía  a  resistência aos sacrifícios necessários.  O Brasil do Plano Real e a Argentina do Plano Cavallo se enquadram, assim,  na  tendência  detectada  por  Albert  Hirschman  no  começo  da  década  de  1980,  investigando o que chamou matriz social e política da inflação latino‐americana.                                                           Sobre  a  experiência  de  estabilização  e  reformas  da  Argentina,  ver  Vicente  Palermo,  “Melhorar  para  piorar?  A  dinâmica  política  das  reformas  estruturais  e  as  raízes  do  colapso  da  convertibilidade”, in Brasílio Sallum Jr. (org.), Brasil e Argentina hoje; política e economia, Bauru, SP,  Edusc, 2004, cap. 3.  46  A  distinção  entre  democracias  majoritárias  e  consensuais  é  explorada  por  Arend  Lijphart,  Democracies: Patterns of Majoritarian and Consensus Government in Twenty‐One Countries, New Haven  e Londres, Yale University Press, 1984, pp. 177‐207.  45

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

51

  “Acima  de  um  limiar  de  tolerância,  a  inflação  é  certamente  o  tipo  de  problema  político  premente  que  aumenta  a  disposição  dos  governos  de  tomar  medidas,  apesar da oposição de interesses poderosos, se houver uma expectativa firme de  que  as  medidas  ajudarão  a  conter  a  inflação.”  [“Beyond  a  threshold  of  tolerance,  inflation certainly is the kind of pressing policy problem that increases the willingness of  governments to take action, in spite of opposition from powerful interests, if there is firm  expectation that the action will help restrain the inflation.”]47  A  esse  efeito  da  inflação  se  acrescentou,  no  nosso  caso,  o  enfraquecimento  das  forças  políticas  tradicionais  por  razões  estritamente  políticas.  Mencionamos  acima as circunstâncias excepcionais que justificavam o  ceticismo em  relação às  chances de êxito de um ataque frontal à inflação após o impeachment de Collor —  a  falta  de  respaldo  eleitoral  direto  de  seu  substituto  legal,  o  Congresso  mergulhado  num  escândalo  de  corrupção,  o  calendário  eleitoral  apertado.  Paradoxalmente,  foram  essas  mesmas  circunstâncias  que  tornaram  possível  o  Plano Real. Onde os analistas diagnosticavam a falta de pré‐condições políticas,  abria‐se  na  verdade  uma  janela  de  oportunidade.  Em  condições  normais,  os  grupos  que  de  algum  modo  se  beneficiavam  do  processo  inflacionário  e  da  desestruturação do estado, incluindo segmentos do Congresso, do setor privado  e  da  própria  burocracia  estatal,  teriam  se  articulado  melhor  para  defender  seus  interesses.  Só  a  desorganização  das  forças  políticas  tradicionais  explica  que  se  tenham  deixado  vencer —  ou  convencer —  por  um  ministro  e  seu  pequeno  grupo de auxiliares e simpatizantes no governo, com respaldo do Presidente da  República, é verdade, mas com apoio muito hesitante de outros partidos que não  o nosso próprio, o PSDB.  A arte da política consiste em criar condições para que se possa realizar um  objetivo para o qual as condições não estão dadas de antemão. Por isso a política  é uma arte e não uma técnica. E sua arma principal na democracia é a persuasão.  Graças  à  persuasão,  ao  convencimento  da  sociedade,  acabou  sendo  possível  formar  os  consensos  mínimos  onde  eles  eram  presumivelmente  mais  difíceis  e  certamente mais necessários: dentro do governo, no Congresso, com os partidos,  ou  seja,  entre os  agentes que  tomam as decisões políticas ou  impedem  que elas  sejam tomadas. Em meio a muitas dúvidas, tínhamos uma certeza, assentada nos  valores  da  nossa  formação  democrática:  que  só  um  programa  que  pudesse  ser  explicado  e  compreendido  pelas  pessoas  seria  capaz  de  derrubar  a  inflação  de  forma duradoura e colocar em marcha a reorganização do Estado brasileiro.  Credibilidade era um requisito crítico num país que sofrera as conseqüências  do fracasso de sucessivos planos de estabilização nos últimos anos. Beneficiamo‐ nos na partida da boa vontade da mídia, da maioria dos empresários, de outros  setores  organizados  da  sociedade  e  do  próprio  Congresso,  que,  embora  céticos  sobre nossas chances de êxito, avalizavam a seriedade de propósitos do ministro                                                           Albert  Hirschman,  “The  social  and  political  matrix  of  inflation:  elaborations  on  the  Latin  American  experience”,  Essays  in  Trespassing;  Economics  to  politics  and  beyond,  Cambridge,  Cambridge University Press, 1981. 

47

52

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  e a competência de sua equipe. Conscientes da importância de manter e ampliar  essa  base  de  confiança,  decidimos  que  não  haveria  surpresas  nem  promessas  difíceis  de  sustentar:  cada  passo  da  nossa  estratégia  de  estabilização  seria  antecipadamente  anunciado  e  explicado  ao  público  em  geral,  sempre  deixando  claro  que  se  tratava,  não  de  um  ato  unilateral  do  governo,  mas  de  um  processo  cujos  resultados  dependeriam  da  convergência  continuada  de  esforços  do  governo,  do  Congresso,  dos  agentes  econômicos  privados,  do  conjunto  da  sociedade.  Muitas  vezes,  estivemos  perto  de  perder  a  batalha  da  confiança.  Com  o  passar  dos  meses  aumentaram  a  aflição  na  sociedade  com  a  aceleração  da  inflação,  as  pressões  por  medidas  de  impacto  no  próprio  governo  e  as  resistências  de  partidos  e  lideranças que viam  no  eventual  sucesso  do plano  de  estabilização a frustração de seus próprios planos políticos.  A  troca  de  moeda  com  a  substituição  de  todo  o  meio  circulante  trouxe  um  reforço  fundamental  a  esse  trabalho  de  convencimento:  o  símbolo  representado  pelo  real,  no  qual  se  condensaram  as  expectativas  de  mudança  difusas  na  sociedade.  Antes mesmo da entrada em circulação da nova moeda, o radar dos partidos  e dos políticos começou a captar a mudança de ânimo da sociedade. A percepção  de  que  isso  poderia  impulsionar  uma  candidatura  presidencial  competitiva  facilitou a tarefa de conseguir apoio para as nossas propostas no Congresso.  Assim se deu o breakthrough: lançado sob o signo da “falta de pré‐condições  políticas”, o Plano Real acabou por se tornar ele próprio a pré‐condição para um  realinhamento das forças políticas favorável às reformas.  Quase por saturação, a velha ordem de coisas deu passagem a uma situação  nova.  A  vitória  na  eleição  presidencial  deu‐nos  a  oportunidade  e  a  responsabilidade de ancorar essa nova situação no leito das instituições, levando  adiante  a  extensa  agenda  de  reformas  que  sabíamos  necessária  para  “segurar  o  real” e manter viva a esperança depositada nele.  Testando os limites do presidencialismo latino-americano O  êxito  do  Plano  Real  aproveitou  a  oportunidade  de  um  momento.  A  consolidação  da  estabilidade  levou  oito  anos  de  esforços  persistentes.  A  continuidade  dos  avanços  que  foi  possível  realizar  ao  longo  desse  período  dependeu de uma estratégia política assentada em dois pilares: 1) a obtenção de  maioria  estável  no  Congresso  mediante  a  partilha  do  poder  no  âmbito  do  Executivo  com  os  partidos  da  coalizão  governista;  2)  a  aplicação  da  liderança  presidencial para fazer convergir a favor das reformas tanto as forças do governo  e dos partidos aliados como o apoio da opinião pública e de setores organizados  da sociedade.  Muitas  vezes  o  Presidente  dispõe  do  instrumento  constitucional  para  transformar  sua  vontade,  senão  em  lei,  em  decreto  ou  medida  provisória  com 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

53

  força da lei.48 E mesmo da autoridade, isto é, do reconhecimento da legitimidade  da decisão, para que a ordem seja obedecida. Por razões da boa política, contudo,  para  ganhar  mais  adeptos  ou  para  suavizar  e  viabilizar  a  efetivação  de  seus  propósitos,  não  exerce  em  toda  a  extensão  o  poder  virtual  e  trata  de  compor  situações  nas  quais,  embora  sua  vontade  não  transpareça  na  integralidade,  as  probabilidades de êxito das políticas e das decisões que deseja efetivar se tornam  maiores.  Acontece que o Executivo, representado pelo Presidente e pelos ministros, é  somente  uma  parte  do  sistema  de  poder  (sem  falar  da  dominação  estruturalmente  exercida  pelas  classes  e  setores  de  classe,  organizados  na  estrutura não formal de mando, que no dia‐a‐dia exercem pressão e dispõem de  recursos  de  poder  entrincheirados  de  mil  maneiras  nas  práticas  sociais).  O  Congresso,  os  partidos,  o  Judiciário,  para  ficar  nos  componentes  formais  da  estrutura de mando, condicionam o jogo político.  As crises que levaram à renúncia do presidente Jânio Quadros e à deposição  do  presidente  João  Goulart  na  década  de  1960  e  o  impeachment  de  Collor  deixaram uma lição clara: a grande questão para o Presidente não é se, mas como  deve  dividir  poder.  O  pior  engano  que  pode  cometer  é  imaginar  que  tem  um  mandato para governar sozinho. Para realizar o que prometeu aos seus eleitores  ele  precisa  do  Congresso.  E  para  obter  maioria  no  Congresso  precisa  fazer  alianças, pois a heterogeneidade da Federação e as peculiaridades do sistema de  representação  proporcional  brasileiro  produzem  um  quadro  partidário  fragmentado, no qual nenhum partido detém sozinho a maioria.  Com  essas  lições  da  história  em  mente,  empenhamo‐nos  pela  coligação  do  nosso partido, o PSDB, com o PFL e o PTB na eleição presidencial e pelo ingresso  posterior  do  PMDB  e  do  PPB  na  coalizão  governista.  O  equilíbrio  entre  os  grandes partidos, deixando o nosso próprio à margem do controle do Congresso,  mesmo  quando  se  tornou  majoritário  na  Câmara  após  as  eleições  de  1998,  revelou‐se fundamental para compor um quadro de estabilidade.  Uma respeitável corrente de cientistas políticos considera o presidencialismo  latino‐americano um caso perdido. A fragmentação dos partidos, de um lado, e a  independência e rigidez dos mandatos do Presidente e do Congresso, do outro,  levariam  o  jogo  político  recorrentemente  ao  impasse.49  O  PSDB,  inspirado  por  esse  tipo  de  diagnóstico,  proclamou‐se  parlamentarista  em  seu  manifesto  de  fundação  em  1988.  Num  plebiscito  realizado  em  1993,  o  parlamentarismo  foi  fragorosamente  derrotado.  Ironia  da  história:  perdemos  o  plebiscito,  um  ano  depois ganhamos as eleições presidenciais e com elas a tarefa de dar sobrevida,  senão um atestado de boa saúde, ao sistema que julgávamos condenado.                                                           A  Constituição  brasileira  autoriza  o  Presidente  da  República,  em  casos  de  urgência,  a  editar  Medidas  Provisórias  com  força  de  lei,  que  perdem  a  validade  se  não  forem  aprovadas  pelo  Congresso dentro de noventa dias.  49 O trabalho citado de Juan Linz e Arturo Valenzuela é representativo desse tipo de abordagem.  48

54

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  Estudos  mais  recentes  sublinham  que  em  vez  de  presidencialismo  é  mais  correto  falar  de  presidencialismos  latino‐americanos,  no  plural.  O  risco  de  impasse  sempre  existe.  Os  meios  e  modos  de  evitá‐lo  variam  conforme  as  especificidades das relações Executivo‐Legislativo, a organização dos partidos, o  conteúdo das decisões em pauta. Só levando em conta essas variáveis, para além  das  generalizações  sobre  sistemas  de  governo,  seria  possível  explicar  os  resultados  positivos,  ainda  que  problemáticos,  alcançados  pela  democracia  em  alguns países da região.50  Uma peculiaridade do Brasil desse ponto de vista é a relativa fraqueza dos  partidos  coexistindo  com  a  força  do  Congresso  como  arena  de  negociação  e  decisão. Somos um caso de extremo de multipartidarismo, com duas dezenas de  partidos  representados  na  Câmara  dos  Deputados,  dos  quais  cinco  ou  seis  relevantes,  nenhum  com  mais  de  20%  dos  assentos.  Argentina,  Chile  e  México  são, em contraste, casos de pluripartidarismo moderadamente concentrado.  As  ditaduras  da  Argentina  e  do  Chile  fecharam  o  Congresso  e  baniram  os  partidos  mas  não  foram  capazes  de  extingui‐los  de  fato —  não  os  principais  partidos, em todo caso. A UCR e o PJ, que polarizavam a política argentina desde  1945, assim como o  PDC  e  o PS  chilenos, cuja  formação  remonta às décadas de  1920  e  1930,  sobreviveram  e  reassumiram  papéis  protagônicos  depois  da  redemocratização. Sua força se explica pela tradição junto aos eleitores e filiados  e  pela  disciplina  das  bancadas  parlamentares. A  disciplina  baseia‐se  no  sistema  eleitoral — proporcional por listas fechadas na Argentina, de distritos binominais  no  Chile —  e  é  reforçada  pela  tradição.  A  sanção  usual  para  o  congressista  que  vota  sistematicamente  contra  a  orientação  do  partido  é  a  exclusão  da  chapa  na  próxima  eleição,  ou  a  expulsão  antes.  Dado  o  peso  da  tradição  e  a  relativa  concentração do voto popular nos grandes partidos, são reduzidas as chances de  reeleição de quem os abandona ou é expulso.  Costumamos  imaginar  no  Brasil  que  menos  partidos  mais  unidos  facilitariam  a  negociação  entre  o  Presidente  e  o  Congresso,  dando  mais  velocidade e consistência à tomada de decisões. A experiência de nossos vizinhos  indica  que  nem  sempre  é  assim.  Partidos  unidos  e  aguerridos  podem  ser  sinônimo de governabilidade no parlamentarismo. No presidencialismo, às vezes  servem para organizar o impasse. A polarização entre o PJ e a UCR na Argentina  e  a  exacerbação  da  rivalidade  entre  os  blocos  de  direita,  centro  e  esquerda  no  Chile compuseram o cenário do colapso da democracia em ambos os países.  A polarização se manteve na Argentina pós‐autoritária, sem chegar ao ponto  de  ruptura  mas  prejudicando  seriamente  os  dois  governos  da  UCR.  A  intransigência  da  oposição  peronista  e  a  disparada  da  inflação  levaram  o  presidente  Alfonsín  à  renúncia  meses  antes  de  completar  o  mandato.  O  presidente Fernando de la Rua, que sucedeu Menem, não completou um ano, seu                                                          Para análises que enfatizam as possibilidades de cooperação, apesar do conflito, entre Executivo  e  Legislativo,  ver  Scott  Morgenstern  e  Benito  Nacif  (orgs.),  Legislative  Politics  in  Latin  America,  Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2002. 

50

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

55

  governo  inviabilizado  pela  incapacidade  de  reverter  ou  administrar  a  crise  de  confiança na paridade peso‐dólar. Na onda de rejeição geral aos políticos (“¡Que  se  vayan  todos!”),  a  UDR  se  fragmentou  e  definhou  enquanto  o  PJ,  embora  também  sofrendo  prejuízos  eleitorais,  consolidou  sua  predominância  relativa,  sustentado  pela  máquina  partidário‐sindical  peronista  e  por  sua  identificação  simbólica  com  os  “descamisados”.51  O  sistema  partidário  argentino  parece  caminhar,  assim,  de  um  quase  bipartidarismo  para  um  pluripartidarismo  com  partido  dominante,  no  qual  as  relações  Executivo‐Legislativo  tenderão  a  oscilar  entre a cooperação e a confrontação conforme o Presidente seja ou não peronista.  A  Junta  Militar  argentina  saiu  de  cena  sem  deixar  quem  reivindicasse  sua  herança política. O legado de Pinochet, ao contrário, foi reconhecido até o fim da  sua  vida  por  uma  direita  chilena  com  bases  sociais  e  eleitorais  consistentes,  representada pela UDI e RN. Isso levou à união das forças de centro e esquerda  representadas  pelo  PDC  e  PS.  O  triângulo  instável  do  passado  foi  substituído,  desse modo, por uma espécie de círculo virtuoso em que a consistência política e  o  êxito  econômico  da  Concertación  se  realimentam  mutuamente,  garantindo‐lhe  ao mesmo tempo a chefia do Executivo e a maioria no Legislativo.  A  transição  do  México  para  uma  democracia  pluralista  é  um  caso  à  parte  nesse  mosaico:  algo  como  uma  perestroika  latino‐americana,  na  qual  um  regime  semi‐autoritário abriu‐se a partir de dentro e de cima, num processo conduzido  por quem acumulava os papéis de chefe do governo e do partido quase único. O  poder  concentrado  permitiu  aos  presidentes  Miguel  de  la  Madrid  (1982‐1988)  e  Carlos  Salinas  de  Gortari  (1988‐1994)  sobrepujar  o  nacional‐estatismo  arraigado  do PRI e levar adiante as reformas econômicas que prepararam o terreno para a  adesão do México ao Tratado de Livre Comércio da América do Norte em janeiro  de  1994.  Sucessivas  reformas  eleitorais  desde  1978  possibilitaram  o  crescimento  da oposição na Câmara dos Deputados, de 17% dos assentos para 48% em 1988 e  52% em 1997, deixando o presidente Ernesto Zedillo (1994‐2000) em minoria no  Congresso  na  segunda  metade  de  seu  mandato.  A  eleição  presidencial  de  2000  apresentou ao México a rotina democrática da alternância no poder e inscreveu‐o  no  clube  dos  presidentes  em  “doble  minoria”.  O  presidente  Vicente  Fox  (2000‐ 2006) foi eleito pelo PAN com 48% dos votos e teve suas principais propostas de  reforma — fiscal, energética e trabalhista — derrotadas no Congresso.  A hegemonia de mais de setenta anos do PRI forjou um mecanismo peculiar  de controle do partido sobre seus representantes: a proibição da reeleição para o  Congresso.  Sem  possibilidade  de  um  segundo  mandato  consecutivo,  o  congressista  depende  do  partido  para  ter  acesso  a  outro  cargo  eletivo  ou  de  nomeação  política.  O  PAN  e  o  PRD,  que  cresceram  sobre  o  terreno  eleitoral  perdido  pelo  PRI,  longe  de  questionar  essa  herança,  trataram  de  usá‐la  para  aumentar  o  poder  de  suas  direções  nacionais.  Perguntamo‐nos  se  esse  quadro  partidário dará lugar a práticas de coalizão e negociação semelhantes às do Chile                                                           Juan  Carlos  Torre,  “A  crise  da  representação  partidária  na  Argentina”,  in  Brasílio  Sallum  Jr.  (org.), op. cit., cap. 4. 

51

56

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  contemporâneo ou a um cabo‐de‐guerra de três pontas mais parecido com o do  Chile pré‐Pinochet.  Uma singularidade brasileira: Congresso forte, partidos fracos A lei de ferro daquilo que no Brasil tem sido chamado de “presidencialismo de  coalizão” diz que, para manter uma base estável no Congresso, o Presidente deve  dividir  poder  na  esfera  do  Executivo,  nomeando  representantes  dos  partidos  aliados para o comando de ministérios e outras posições.52  Se isso resguarda o Presidente, os demais atores políticos e o país como um  todo  das  conseqüências  imprevisíveis  do  impasse  entre  o  Presidente  e  o  Congresso, não garante por si só apoio da maioria dos congressistas às propostas  específicas  do  Executivo.  Este  tem  que  ser  conseguido  voto  a  voto,  projeto  a  projeto, numa tarefa de Sísifo para o Presidente e seu núcleo de poder — dentro  do  qual  a  função  de  “coordenador  político”,  normalmente  um  ministro  com  gabinete no Palácio do Planalto, se destaca como um cargo de alta rotatividade.  Acontece  que,  com  exceção  dos  partidos  ditos  de  esquerda,  desde  as  variantes de origem comunista ao PT, que vêm de uma tradição de “centralismo  democrático”,  os  demais  partidos  brasileiros  têm  um  comando  frouxo  sobre  as  respectivas bancadas.  Embora  alguns  insistam  em  olhar  nossos  partidos  com  olhos  europeus,  a  sociedade  brasileira  é  outra  coisa.  Tem  menos  hierarquia,  mais  mobilidade,  muito menos pontos estáveis de referência. As ideologias são débeis para definir  o  comportamento  das  pessoas.  Sob  a  ditadura,  a  opção  era  simples:  uns  sustentavam  o  regime,  outros  lutavam  por  democracia.  Num  regime  de  liberdade,  começa  a  haver  muitas  alternativas.  Ao  mesmo  tempo,  porém,  diminuiu  a  diferença  entre  as  ideologias  proclamadas  pelos  partidos.  Os  programas são muito parecidos e as práticas, infelizmente, também.  Ao  contrário  das  ditaduras  argentina  e  chilena,  a  brasileira  manteve  o  Congresso em funcionamento e extinguiu os partidos existentes duas vezes: em  1965, quando impôs o bipartidarismo, e em 1979, quando o aboliu. Isso truncou  efetivamente  a  evolução  do  sistema  partidário.  A  própria  ditadura  não  deixou  para  trás  uma  direita  eleitoralmente  competitiva,  como  no  Chile,  o  que  por  sua  vez privou as forças democráticas de um adversário comum que as impedisse de  se  dispersar.  Vários  líderes  e  algumas  siglas  anteriores  voltaram  à  cena,  mas  o  jogo político se organizou em outras bases: primeiro, por um período curto, em  torno do PMDB; mais recentemente, em torno da polarização PT vs. PSDB.  Temos,  ademais,  um  sistema  eleitoral  que  leva  a  extremos  a  tendência  à  indisciplina  partidária.  O  multipartidarismo  é  um  efeito  típico  dos  sistemas  de  representação  proporcional,  ainda  mais  numa  federação  grande  e  heterogênea  como  a  brasileira.  A  frouxidão  do  vínculo  dos  representantes  eleitos  com  o                                                           A  caracterização  do  sistema  institucional  brasileiro  anterior  a  1964  como  um  “presidencialismo  de coalizão” foi feita por Sérgio Abranches, “Presidencialismo de Coalizão: O Dilema Institucional  Brasileiro”, in Dados, vol. 31, nº 1, 1988, pp. 5‐33  52

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

57

  partido  é  característica  do  sistema  proporcional  por  lista  aberta  adotado  no  Brasil,  em  que  a  posição  do  candidato  na  chapa  partidária  depende  de  sua  votação individual.  Adotado  na  década  de  1940,  quando  o  Brasil  ainda  era  uma  sociedade  predominantemente rural e com fortes traços oligárquicos, há tempo esse sistema  dá  sinais  de  fadiga.  Numa  sociedade  de  massas  democrática,  com  colégios  eleitorais  (os  estados)  onde  centenas  de  candidatos  a  deputado  disputam  individualmente o voto de milhões de eleitores, a eleição por lista aberta torna‐se  uma  roleta  na  qual  a  “banca” —  o  poder  econômico  e  corporações  influentes  aninhadas  no  estado,  no  setor  privado  ou,  pior,  na  interseção  entre  ambos —  sempre  ganha  em  última  análise.  A  taxa  de  reeleição  para  a  Câmara  dos  Deputados  se  mantém  baixa,  de  50%  ou  menos,  sem  que  a  alta  rotatividade  signifique  renovação  em  qualquer  sentido  determinável,  muito  menos  melhora  de qualidade. As campanhas eleitorais custam cada vez mais caro. As chances de  reeleição  de  um  deputado  dependem  cada  vez  menos  do  bom  desempenho  de  suas  funções  de  legislador  e  fiscal  do  governo  e  cada  vez  mais  do  seu  atendimento  a  clientelas  locais  ou  setoriais.  Isso  faz  do  deputado  típico  um  representante em busca de representados, isto é, de novas clientelas que tentará  atender  via  emendas  orçamentárias,  favores  do  governo  ou  vantagens  legais.  Dessa  maneira  temos  um  sistema  representativo  cuja  “representação”,  quando  chega a se organizar, é pós‐eleições.  Na  prática  esse  mecanismo  de  relacionamento  dos  deputados  com  o  eleitorado  e  com  os  partidos,  bem  como  com  o  Executivo,  torna  a  própria  caracterização  de  nosso  sistema  de  governo  um  tanto  imprecisa.  Como  falar  propriamente  de  “presidencialismo  de  coalizão”  quando  a  fragmentação  de  interesses e de focos de poder desborda os canais partidários? A noção é útil, mas  precisa  ser  contextualizada.  Antes  tivéssemos  a  possibilidade  de  organizar  alianças  estáveis  e  coalizões.  Na  verdade,  o  aspecto  “imperial”  do  presidencialismo  brasileiro  deriva  menos  da  vontade  do  Presidente  do  que  das  condições  efetivas  de  funcionamento  do  jogo  político.  Dada  a  fraqueza  relativa  dos  partidos  e  a  força  do  Congresso,  queira  ou  não  o  Presidente,  se  ele  não  se  mantém  forte,  o  “fisiologismo”  (como  vulgarmente  se  chama  o  sistema  de  pressões  diretas  dos  parlamentares  sobre  os  recursos  públicos,  materiais  e  políticos)  predomina  sobre  a  capacidade  de  o  governo  definir  e  implementar  uma agenda de transformações no país.  O jogo político entre o Legislativo e o Executivo se torna muito mais volátil  nesse  tipo  de  representação.  Por  isso,  as  tentativas  de  relacionamento  “institucional”  entre  o  Presidente  e  os  partidos  funcionam  precariamente.  Pela  mesma  razão,  a  negociação  política,  ainda  que  legítima,  aparece  aos  olhos  do  público como uma negociação “de balcão”: ela se dá quase individualmente ou,  no  caso  das  “frentes  parlamentares”,  juntando  deputados  que  podem  ir,  por  exemplo,  do  PT  ao  PP,  unidos  em  situações  específicas  ao  redor  do  mesmo 

58

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  propósito,  como  a  redução  da  dívida  agrária,  a  oposição à  facilitação  do  aborto  ou a defesa do parlamentarismo.  Não  obstante,  o  Congresso,  com  suas  peculiaridades  e  morosidades,  representa os interesses e as visões existentes na sociedade. Cabe ao governo (e  principalmente  ao  Presidente)  entender  os  termos  do  jogo  democrático.  O  Presidente  precisa  ter  equilíbrio  para  perceber  que  as  obstruções,  emendas  e  negaças do Legislativo muitas vezes propiciam entendimentos que melhoram os  resultados.  Nem  sempre,  é  verdade.  Neste  caso,  cabe  ao  Presidente  bater  o  pé,  dentro das regras do jogo. E se não obtiver resultado, ir novamente à sociedade e  insistir na defesa de suas teses. É por isso que nas democracias a luta é contínua e  as melhorias são incrementais.  Existe  uma  tensão  inevitável  entre  os  papéis  do  Presidente  como  representante  da  maioria  da  nação  e  articulador  da  maioria  parlamentar.  Sem  alianças  o  Presidente  não  governa.  Mas  se  ele  “se  entrega”  ao  Congresso,  tampouco conseguirá governar no sentido de executar seu programa.   Alianças  para  quê?  Apenas  para  se  manter  no  poder,  ou  para  atingir  objetivos  mais  amplos?  Essa  é  a  questão  a  ser  enfrentada  logo  no  início  do  mandato,  quando  os  partidos  (o  do  Presidente,  os  coligados  ou,  quando  nem  assim se consegue a maioria, os dos ex‐adversários), com apetite voraz, sentam‐ se à mesa para discutir que partes terão no latifúndio do poder. É o momento da  formação do ministério e da definição dos comandos parlamentares (controle das  mesas  da  Câmara  e  do  Senado  e  designação  de  líderes).  Os  objetivos  mais  amplos põem limites para as concessões que o Presidente pode fazer aos aliados  e a seu próprio partido. Se ele não for capaz de identificar e preservar as partes  do  Executivo  essenciais  para  realizar  seus  projetos,  pode  vir  a  nomear  pessoas  erradas  para  posições  chave.  No  nosso  caso,  a  área  econômica,  incluindo  ministérios  e  instituições  financeiras  federais,  e  as  pastas  mais  importantes  da  área  social,  começando  por  educação  e  saúde,  ficaram  fora  das  composições  políticas. A privatização de empresas estatais tirou do balcão dezenas de cargos  de  direção  que  costumavam  ser  objeto  de  barganha.  O  mesmo  efeito  teve  a  introdução  de  processos  formais  de  seleção  para  gerências  regionais  e  intermediárias em áreas como previdência social, reforma agrária e preservação  ambiental. De resto, mesmo em posições abertas à indicação dos partidos aliados  foi  possível  conciliar  critérios  políticos  com  competência  técnica  e  alinhamento  aos objetivos do governo.  Membros  da  oposição  e  outros  críticos  do  governo  atribuíram‐nos  a  montagem de um “rolo compressor” no Congresso, azeitado pela distribuição de  cargos  e  verbas  orçamentárias.  Na  realidade  o  espaço  para  nomeações  políticas  diminuiu, pelas razões acima, assim como diminuiu a margem para as chamadas  “emendas  paroquiais”  depois  do  escândalo  envolvendo  membros  da  comissão  de orçamento em 1993. Se o uso clientelístico de cargos e verbas fosse a chave da  maioria  parlamentar  do  governo,  seria  inexplicável  como  tivemos  apoio  mais  amplo, por mais tempo, em torno de uma pauta legislativa muito mais ampla e 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

59

  complexa,  contando  com  menos  meios  de  barganha  do  que  os  governos  anteriores.  A nosso ver, a chave da maioria foi outra: foi o projeto mesmo — a “missão”  legitimada pelas urnas e pela opinião pública — em nome do qual o governo fez  alianças e buscou apoio no Congresso. O senso comum sugere que, quanto mais  o  governo  pede  ao  Congresso  em  termos  de  produção  legislativa,  mais  alto  o  preço que deve estar preparado para pagar no varejo das negociações com a base  parlamentar.  Nossa  experiência  sugere  o  contrário:  a  consistência  da  agenda  legislativa do governo com seu compromisso maior de “segurar o real”, em vez  de dificultar, facilitou a tarefa (de resto sempre árdua) de manter o atendimento  das demandas específicas dos partidários e aliados dentro de limites razoáveis.  O apoio das ruas não substitui o dos partidos. Sem alianças estáveis com os  partidos, teria sido difícil para o governo superar a crise cambial de 1999, quando  a  sustentação  daquele  compromisso  pareceu  momentaneamente  ameaçada  e  a  popularidade do Presidente acusou o golpe. A combinação de flexibilidade tática  para negociar e renegociar uma maioria parlamentar com obstinação estratégica  para defender os pontos essenciais da agenda de reformas permitiu atravessar os  inevitáveis  altos  e  baixos  da  popularidade  presidencial  mantendo  ambos,  a  maioria e o rumo do governo.53  Virando a página do nacional-estatismo A  “missão”  que  legitima  a  ação  do  Presidente  é  enunciada  pelo  povo  quase  sempre  em  termos  genéricos,  embora  não  necessariamente  vagos:  controlar  a  inflação,  diminuir  a  pobreza,  aumentar  o  emprego,  combater  o  crime.  Cabe  ao  líder  traduzir  essa  expectativa  difusa  num  projeto,  uma  seqüência  de  ações  que  apontem consistentemente para o bem comum desejado. Isso depende do alcance  da  sua  visão —  de  sua  compreensão  do  passado  e  antecipação  do  futuro  do  país — e da capacidade de reunir pessoas para formular e implementar medidas  concretas de acordo com essa visão.  Nosso esforço de traduzir a missão de controlar a inflação num projeto mais  ambicioso de reformas teria que superar um grande obstáculo: a visão nacional‐ estatista  enraizada  na  cultura  e  nas  instituições  políticas  do  Brasil  e  uma  constelação de interesses ligados a essa visão.  Mencionamos  acima  o  atraso  relativo  dessa  discussão  entre  os  políticos  brasileiros.  Eles  não  estavam  sozinhos  no  grupo  dos  retardatários.  No  Brasil,  como  em  outros  lugares,  uma  parcela  importante  dos  intelectuais  se  manteve  apegada  a  uma  visão  basicamente  estatista —  auto‐rotulada  de  esquerdista,  socialista,  nacionalista,  progressista —  mesmo  depois  de  posta  em  xeque  pelo  colapso da União Soviética e pela aceleração da globalização capitalista. Alianças                                                          Ver Eduardo Graeff, “The flight of the beetle; party politics and decision making process in the  Cardoso  government”.  Documento  apresentado  ao  V  Congresso  da  Associação  de  Estudos  Brasileiros,  Recife,  Brasil,  junho  de  2000,  traduzido  por  Ted  Goertzel.  http://www.crab.rutgers.edu/~goertzel/flightofbeetle.htm  53

60

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  surpreendentes  ocorriam  entre  esses  companheiros  de  viagem.  Nas  discussões  sobre  ajuste  fiscal,  muitas  vezes  o  populismo  orçamentário  tradicional  dos  adeptos  do  “gasta  que  o  dinheiro  aparece”  socorreu‐se  de  argumentos  pseudo‐ keynesianos de economistas reverenciados pela esquerda.  A influência que o nacional‐estatismo manteve no Brasil é proporcional aos  avanços que ele chancelou no século passado. Fomos o país que mais cresceu no  mundo  entre  1930  e  1980.  A  industrialização  por  substituição  de  importações  legou‐nos  um  parque  industrial  sem  paralelo  na  América  Latina,  vasto,  diversificado  e,  como  se  verificou  após  a  abertura  da  economia,  razoavelmente  competitivo.  A  expansão  do  mercado  interno  protegido  sustentou  os  níveis  de  emprego num período de crescimento demográfico e urbano explosivo. O estado  varguista  estendeu  às  massas  recém‐chegadas  às  cidades  uma  proteção  social  precária  mas  inédita,  muito  melhor  que  o  desamparo  em  que  viviam  no  meio  rural.  A  derrapagem  da  economia  na  década  de  1980  minou  as  bases  do  regime  militar  mas  não  a  confiança  na  velha  forma  de  estado  e  em  seu  modelo  econômico.  A maioria  da Constituinte  (1987‐1988)  trabalhou  com o  pressuposto  que  a  democracia  bastaria  para  repor  o  país  nos  trilhos  do  desenvolvimento,  apenas  acrescentando  garantias  dos  direitos  individuais  e  sociais  aos  pilares  da  economia  autárquico‐estatal.  (Mesma  crença,  diga‐se  de  passagem,  professada  por  Alfonsín  em  seu  vibrante  discurso  de  posse  como  presidente  da  Argentina  em 1983: “Con la democracia se come, se educa y se cura.”)  Além  de  apego  ao  passado  e  dos  interesses  especiais  melhor  acomodados  sob o manto da proteção estatal, o que alimentava a resistência à mudança era a  falta  de  alternativas  claras —  nevoeiro  ideológico  que  ora  encobria,  ora  se  confundia  com  os  gargalos  institucionais  à  tomada  de  decisões.  As  alternativas  não eram óbvias, de fato. Diferentemente do México, o Brasil não tinha a maior  economia  capitalista  do  planeta  à  sua  porta  oferecendo  possibilidades  supostamente  ilimitadas  de  integração  comercial  e  industrial  e  saída  para  excedentes  de  mão‐de‐obra.  Mais  de  dez  vezes  maior  que  o  Chile,  não  podia  apostar  apenas  na  modernização  e  diversificação  do  setor  primário‐exportador  para garantir emprego e renda à sua população. A exportação de manufaturados,  na qual o regime militar investiu com algum êxito, custou a ser reconhecida, não  como  uma  alternativa  excludente,  mas  complementar  à  expansão  do  mercado  interno.  A  crítica  da  visão  nacional‐estatista  amadureceu,  de  todo  modo,  nos  cinco  anos  entre  a  promulgação  da  Constituição  e  o  Plano  Real,  impulsionada  pelas  ondas  de  choque  da  queda  do  muro  de  Berlim  e  pela  percepção  de  que  os  avanços  da  tecnologia  da  informação  e  a  constituição  de  blocos  econômicos  regionais  abriam  uma  nova  fase  do  capitalismo  mundial.  Correndo  por  fora  do  sistema  político,  inicialmente,  o  debate  entre  especialistas  (economistas,  principalmente)  de  alguns  centros  universitários,  núcleos  de  excelência  da  administração  federal,  centros  de  estudos  ligados  a  entidades  empresariais,  foi 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

61

  decantando uma nova visão do Brasil e de seu lugar no mundo e propostas para  uma  estratégia  de  desenvolvimento  adequada  a  essa  realidade.  Collor  abraçou  algumas dessas propostas em nome de uma vaga “modernidade”. Sua passagem  meteórica sacudiu o  mundo político e  ampliou o  espaço  para  a  discussão  sobre  reformas  na  mídia.  Ao  levar  ao  paroxismo  a  intervenção  presidencial  na  cena  política  e  na  vida  econômica,  é  possível  que  ele  tenha  deixado  na  sociedade  a  demanda  por  uma  liderança  que,  sem  retroceder  à  visão  do  passado,  pudesse  restabelecer a confiança numa agenda de mudanças menos traumática.  Quando  o  agravamento  da  crise  inflacionária  depois  do  impeachment  bateu  no  limite  de  tolerância  da  sociedade  e  baixou  às  resistências  à  mudança  no  Congresso,  havia  uma  agenda  alternativa  suficientemente  amadurecida  para  oferecer ao país.  Nossa  reflexão  a  esse  respeito  havia  avançado  durante  os  trabalhos  da  Constituinte.  O  programa  do  PSDB,  fundado  em  julho  de  1988  a  partir  de  uma  dissidência  do  PMDB,  incorporaria  muito  das  novas  idéias  que  colocamos  ou  tentamos colocar em prática a partir do Plano Real: menos protecionismo e mais  desenvolvimento tecnológico; menos corporativismo e maior permeabilidade do  estado às demandas e à participação da base da sociedade. Criticávamos tanto os  defensores empedernidos dos monopólios estatais quanto os que viam qualquer  intervenção do estado  como  ameaça à  economia  de  mercado. Estatização versus  privatização,  alertávamos,  era  um  falso  problema  quando  reduzido  a  uma  questão de princípio, sem levar em conta os limites e possibilidades da ação do  estado e da iniciativa privada em cada setor.  Era  tarde  para  tentar  mudar  os  rumos  da  Constituinte  diante  das  opiniões  nacional‐estatistas  e  pressões  corporativas.  Mais  adiante,  contudo,  quando  se  abriu  a  janela  de  oportunidade  do  Plano  Real,  a  interlocução  com  os  setores  reformistas  da  sociedade  proporcionou‐nos  ao  mesmo  tempo  massa  crítica  intelectual e respaldo na opinião pública para avançar.  A presença de um híbrido de intelectual e político no Ministério da Fazenda  e  depois  na  Presidência  da  República  ajudou  a  estender  e  manter  uma  ponte  entre o governo, os partidos e o Congresso, de um lado, e os núcleos reformistas  da universidade, da tecnoburocracia e do empresariado, do outro.  Definido  um  rumo  alternativo,  dissipado  o  nevoeiro  ideológico,  as  resistências  à  mudança  se  apresentaram,  tendo  à  frente  uma  oposição  parlamentar  minoritária  mas  aguerrida,  encabeçada  pelo  PT,  e  um  segmento  importante  do  movimento  sindical,  baseado  principalmente  no  funcionalismo  público e empregados das empresas estatais.  O  debate  sobre  as  reformas  nunca  chegou  a  provocar  um  cisma  na  sociedade.  Quando  isso  poderia  ter  acontecido,  o  governo  preferiu  limitar  seus  objetivos  a  alimentar  polarizações  que  poderiam  esgarçar  as  regras  do  jogo  democrático. Várias vezes, contudo, às vésperas de votações difíceis, o Presidente  apelou  publicamente  aos  setores  favoráveis  às  propostas  do  governo.  Não  para  constranger  o  Congresso,  mas  para  contrabalançar  as  pressões  contrárias  e 

62

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  legitimar  o  voto  que  a  maioria —  mesmo  sem  muito  entusiasmo,  como  no  caso  da reforma da previdência — se dispunha a dar.  O  jogo  entre  liderança  presidencial,  Congresso  e  setores  organizados  da  sociedade deixaria de fora a imensa maioria do povo, e assim teria conseqüências  limitadas, se não fosse pela intervenção de outra instância política fundamental  no  mundo  contemporâneo —  a  opinião  pública  mediada  e  produzida  pelos  meios de comunicação de massa.  O  Brasil  é  um  país  com  proporcionalmente  poucos  leitores  mas  com  uma  quantidade  de  telespectadores  e  radiouvintes  que  cobre  praticamente  a  totalidade  da  população.  A  oferta  de  informação  pelos  dois  veículos,  rádio  e  televisão, é razoavelmente pluralista e independente. A força política das massas  informadas  pela  mídia  eletrônica  se  fez  sentir  pela  primeira  vez  na  campanha  por “eleições diretas‐já”, em 1984, que marcou o ocaso do regime militar. Todos  os  acontecimentos  políticos  importantes  desde  então  trazem  a  sua  marca,  da  eleição indireta de Tancredo Neves para Presidente ao impeachment de Collor, do  Plano Cruzado ao Real, passando pelas eleições periódicas.  A  presença  desse  ator  difuso  altera  profundamente  as  formas  de  exercício  democrático do poder. Não basta ser votado, ainda que por dezenas de milhões,  nem  estar  revestido  de  autoridade  legal.  A  legitimação  das  decisões  requer  o  esforço  incessante  de  explicar  suas  razões  e  convencer  a  opinião  pública.  Recorremos  intensamente  à  mídia  para  explicar  e  sustentar  perante  a  opinião  pública cada passo do Plano Real e das reformas.  Tropeços  objetivos —  a  flutuação  abrupta  do  câmbio  no  começo  de  1999,  sobretudo,  cujo  impacto  inflacionário  foi  absorvido  mas  trincou  a  confiança  da  sociedade  no  governo —  e  dificuldades  subjetivas  para  sustentar  nossa  agenda  política  no  debate  público  custaram‐nos  a  perda  da  sucessão  presidencial  em  2002.  A  alternância  no  poder,  não  desejada  por  quem  sai,  obviamente,  mas  planejada  e  conduzida  com  tranqüilidade  pelo  Presidente  no  cargo  e  pelo  sucessor  eleito,  acabou  sendo  uma  prova  de  fogo,  não  só  da  consolidação  da  democracia, mas da própria agenda de reformas.  Lula surpreendeu os investidores externos, o país e a maioria do seu próprio  partido  ao  trocar  a  retórica  de  oposição  radical  ao  “modelo  neoliberal”  por  um  compromisso  expresso —  que  manteve  até  o  presente —  com  as  premissas  da  estabilidade  e  da  abertura  da  economia.  Também  manteve  a  premissa  fundamental  da  estabilidade  política  ao  optar —  contrariando,  novamente,  os  impulsos hegemonistas do PT — por uma coalizão ampla, abrangendo forças de  centro e direita, para se garantir maioria no Congresso.  Este  não  é  o  contexto  para  enfatizar  as  diferenças  que  persistem  entre  os  pólos  simbolizados  pelo  PT  e  pelo  PSDB.  O  fato  é  que  o  processo  político  de  algum  modo  reduziu  a  dramaticidade  dessas  diferenças.  Não  se  trata  mais  de  quebrar  uma  forma  de  estado  e  assentar  as  bases  de  outra.  Na  prática,  essa  questão  transitou  em  julgado,  embora  ainda  ecoe  no  debate  público.  A  controvérsia  entre  “monetaristas”  e  “desenvolvimentistas”,  que  foi  acalorada 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

63

  dentro do nosso governo e ganhou maior visibilidade recentemente, não põe em  causa conceitos como privatização, abertura comercial, responsabilidade fiscal. O  custo político de  mudanças específicas nessas áreas  tende  a diminuir  daqui  por  diante. E, pelo menos em tese, abre‐se espaço na agenda para outros temas que  avançaram  pouco,  como  as  reformas  tributária,  do  judiciário  e  do  sistema  eleitoral. 

Oportunidade, paixão e perspectiva  A mudança em sociedades complexas às vezes se dá por “curtos‐circuitos”. Um  gesto,  uma  greve,  um  choque  emocional,  uma  proposta  galvanizadora,  são  capazes de despertar reações em cadeia que levam a transformações muito mais  profundas do que havia sido inicialmente imaginado ou desejado. Dependendo,  naturalmente, da história das reivindicações, dos conflitos de classe, dos choques  ideológicos, das frustrações pré‐existentes etc.  Foi  o  que  ocorreu  com  o  Plano  Real.  A  sociedade  brasileira,  cansada  da  inflação  e  de  seus  efeitos  nefastos,  viu  nele  uma  saída.  Aderiu  a  ele  contra  a  opinião  de  muitas  pessoas  e  contra  muitos  interesses.  Em  certos  momentos,  contra  a  maioria  dos  “bem  pensantes”  e  dos  pretensos  donos  das  massas  populares.  O “pragmatismo responsável”, no entanto, não explica a mudança. Sem uma  liderança  que  apresente  um  caminho  aceito  como  válido  pela  maioria  não  acontecem  transformações  significativas  em  uma  sociedade  democrática.  E  esta  aceitação  não  se  dá  às  cegas.  Sem  uma  pedagogia  democrática,  sem  que  haja  o  convencimento,  quer  dizer,  o  esforço  para  “vencer  juntos”,  a  ordem  tradicional  prevalece sobre os ímpetos modernizadores e mudancistas.  A  crise  inflacionária  abriu  os  ouvidos  da  sociedade,  incluindo  seus  setores  organizados influentes e a massa desorganizada dos eleitores, para propostas de  mudança que em outras circunstâncias seriam ignoradas ou rejeitadas. Dispor de  uma liderança capaz de aproveitar essa janela de oportunidade foi obra do acaso,  em  última  análise.  Dar  continuidade  às  mudanças  requereu  muita  obstinação  e  alguma arte.  Implantar políticas é um processo coletivo. Insistimos no conceito: processo.  A  imprensa,  a  opinião  pública,  o  Congresso  e  membros  do  próprio  governo  muitas vezes esperam, até imploram por um ato, um gesto heróico que solucione  logo  as  aflições  do  povo,  ou  os  interesses  de  algum  grupo.  Estes  últimos  talvez  possam  ser  atendidos  num  rompante.  Os  interesses  de  todo  um  povo,  não.  Dependem de ação continuada que mude práticas, mentalidades, estruturas.  Não por acaso as reformas são tão difíceis. Nem por outra razão quem deseja  mudar  de  verdade  às  vezes  se  sente  só.  As  estruturas  pesam.  Os  interesses  organizados atuam. O sonho faz parte da arte da política, sob a forma antiga de  ideologias  cristalizadas  ou,  mais  modernamente,  inspirado  em  maior  grau  por 

64

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  visões do que por certezas. De qualquer modo, sempre é necessário ter objetivos  e tratar de  alcançá‐los, ainda que  eles se  reduzam  à  manutenção  do poder  pelo  desfrute  dele.  E  há,  permanentemente,  um  jogo  entre  as  estruturas  nacionais  e  internacionais  (dos  partidos,  das  igrejas,  dos  sindicatos,  das  empresas,  das  organizações econômicas internacionais, da burocracia civil e militar, da mídia),  de  um  lado,  e,  de  outro,  os  movimentos,  as  propostas,  as  lideranças,  a  busca  contínua  do  convencimento  para  ganhar  mais  adeptos  e  acumular  mais  força  para se chegar aonde se deseja.  Quem  menosprezar  um  dos  lados,  seja  o  do  já  estabelecido,  mesmo  que  antiquado  ou  aparentemente  frágil,  seja  o  dos  impulsos  que  levam  à  mudança,  com  suas  propostas  e  com  o  tecer  do  novo,  ainda  que  a  partir  do  antigo,  não  caminha.  Quantas  vezes,  na  ânsia  de  buscar  mudanças,  somos  obrigados  a  pactuar com o oposto? No ponto de partida não há certeza sobre o vencedor da  aposta. A vontade política e a firmeza dos objetivos não asseguram a vitória. O  resultado  dependerá  sempre  da  ação  de  muitos  e  das  repercussões  das  ações  e  dos desejos de quem manda.   Como  pode  um  governante  prometer,  por  exemplo,  a  criação  deste  ou  daquele número de empregos se não é ele nem seu governo que controla todas as  variáveis da vida econômica? Há mudanças na tecnologia, nos fluxos de capital,  na estratégia  das empresas  e numa  vasta quantidade de  fatores  que  influem de  maneira direta na questão do emprego, muitas vezes reduzindo dramaticamente  os  postos  de  trabalho  neste  ou  naquele  setor.  O  líder  pode  e  deve,  é  claro,  assumir  o  compromisso  de  executar  idéias,  adotar  programas  e  tomar  medidas  que conduzam a melhoras na situação da economia e do emprego, mas agirá mal  se prometer cifras.  O pragmatismo com objetivos definidos implica um cálculo e uma aposta. O  cálculo  diz  respeito  aos  apoios  necessários  à  sustentação  geral  da  política  governamental, mesmo quando em detrimento de objetivos específicos. A aposta  tem a ver com a crença de quem conduz de que é capaz de induzir (ou, no limite,  forçar) os aliados, inclusive os de última hora, a aceitar os objetivos que pretende  alcançar.  O risco de perder o controle do processo ou de o governo se descaracterizar  é permanente. Trata‐se de uma aventura perigosa, pois mesmo com a melhor das  intenções pode‐se errar nas apostas. O êxito depende de condições objetivas e de  disposições  de  vontade  que  não  se  definem  nem  são  limitadas  apenas  pelo  círculo maior do poder. As pessoas reagirão indiferentes à vontade e à motivação  dos atores principais, e, em certas circunstâncias, até aos seus êxitos, se estes não  forem suficientemente amplos e consistentes para convencer a maioria.  De qualquer forma, política não é apenas a continuação da guerra por outros  meios,  não  é  a  substituição  da  força  pela  submissão.  Nem  é  um  método  para  contar e separar os bons dos maus. É a arte de persuadir os “maus” a se tornarem  “bons”, ou em todo caso a agirem como se fossem, nem que seja pelo temor das  conseqüências.  De  transformar  os  inimigos  em  adversários,  os  adversários 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

65

  eventualmente em aliados. Quando ocorre a cooptação em vez da persuasão (por  diferentes  meios),  o  lugar  da  política  é  ocupado  pelo  escambo  entre  interesses  menores. O drama é que são tênues os limites entre a grandeza e a perdição.  Para  praticar  essa  arte  difícil  não  é  indispensável  ter  formação  acadêmica  nem  muitas  horas  de  leitura.  Vários  líderes  notáveis  não  as  têm.  Mas  certa  compreensão da história ajuda muito. Numa época em que tudo é “do mundo”,  tudo  é  global,  é  preciso  ter  uma  visão  razoável  do  conjunto  e  ser  capaz  de  entender  as  condições  sociais  de  seu  tempo  para  que  se  consiga  exercer  uma  liderança efetiva, que não pretenda fazer tabula rasa do que os outros fizeram e  para conseguir direcionar melhor o que veio do passado e sentar as bases do que  se quer para o futuro.  Também  ajuda  ter  uma  índole “persuadível”, abusando  de  um  neologismo  extraído  da  obra  poética  de  Jane  Austen.  Hoje  a  democracia  é  um  processo  do  qual  os  cidadãos  querem  participar  não  somente  no  ato  de  votar  ou  mesmo  de  aprovar  (como,  por  exemplo,  em  um  plebiscito),  mas  de  deliberar.  Albert  Hirschman,  contrapondo‐se  à  tradição  que  valoriza  ter  opiniões  políticas  vigorosas  e  rígidas,  salientou  a  importância  de  as  opiniões  se  formarem,  não  antes,  mas  durante  o  processo  de  discussão  e  deliberação.  Mentes  abertas,  espíritos  psicologicamente  mais  dispostos  à  convergência  e  à  transigência,  que  favorecem o diálogo, tanto da parte dos líderes como dos liderados, seriam assim  mais condizentes com a condução e a durabilidade do jogo democrático.54  Essa  reviravolta  do  mundo  contemporâneo  tornou  Cícero  outra  vez  referência, em seu elogio da retórica como fundamento da educação do Príncipe.  Para ele, o modo de vida mais nobre era a devoção virtuosa ao serviço público. A  amizade entre os homens, a boa vontade, permite que o bom governo se baseie  na cooperação livre dos cidadãos. Para que esses valores sustentem a República é  necessário  que  existam  leis  e  que  as  pessoas  estejam  convencidas  de  sua  validade, o que requer que os homens públicos sejam capazes de usar a razão e a  emoção.  O  jogo  entre  essas  duas  qualidades  se  desenvolve  por  meio  do  que  se  chamava de “retórica”, base para o convencimento. A obediência não será obtida  pelo  medo  e  pela  coerção,  e  sim  pela  razão  e  pelo  amor,  construídos  por  uma  espécie de diálogo socrático, que seria o apanágio da liderança.55  A  palavra,  nos  dias  de  hoje,  é  a  “mensagem”  e  o  meio  de  sua  difusão  é  eletrônico  e  não  mais  o  púlpito  ou  a  tribuna.  Os  efeitos  do  rádio  (e,  posteriormente,  da  TV)  já  se  faziam  sentir  na  “política  de  massas”,  que  caracterizou  as  mobilizações  fascistas  e  autoritárias  de  modo  geral  e  que  serviu  de  argamassa  ao  populismo  terceiro‐mundista.  Agora  é  a  própria  política  democrática que apela a esses meios e à Internet. Tudo ocorre em tempo real, a  despeito da distância física, mas com uma diferença: a Internet é essencialmente                                                           Albert  Hirschman,  “Opinionated  opinions  and  democracy”,  in  A  Propensity  to  Self‐Subversion,  Cambridge e Londres, Harvard University, 1995, pp. 77‐84.  55  Sobre  a  atualidade  de  Cícero,  ver  o  cap.  6  do  excelente  livro  de  Gerard  B.  Wegemer,  Thomas  Morus on Statesmanship, Washington, The Catholic University of America Press, 1996.  54

66

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

  interativa e pouco a pouco o rádio, a TV e mesmo o jornal e a revista vão criando  espaços democráticos para “o outro lado”, para a reação das pessoas.  Tudo  fica  mais  fácil  quando  há  símbolos  que  ajudam  a  visualizar  a  mudança. A política lida com conteúdos simbólicos e os líderes buscam exercer a  forma  moderna  do  que  Gramsci  chamava,  com  outra  conotação,  de  hegemonia  cultural.  Isso  requer  qualidades  de  “ator”,  que  não  se  dissociam  da  experiência  prévia de cada um.  No  jogo  entre  simbolismo  e  realizações  práticas,  o  líder  precisa  ser  capaz,  pela  intuição  ou  pelo  conhecimento,  de  elaborar  e  transmitir  uma  “visão”  dos  problemas  que  enfrenta,  uma  visão  da  sociedade  e  do  país.  Quando  se  trata  de  políticos de expressão nacional, dadas as condicionantes da globalização, devem  possuir algum tipo de “sentimento do mundo”. Estadista é aquele que projeta o  futuro  do  seu  país,  consegue  enxergá‐lo  no  contexto  mundial  e  é  capaz  de  conduzi‐lo nessa direção.  Num mundo de mensagens intercomunicadas e de participação crescente, o  líder  democrático,  embora  consciente  dos  conflitos  e  das  diferenças  de  classe,  deve propor valores que possam ser compartilhados pela parcela majoritária da  sociedade. Caso contrário, perde força. Como sua relação com os liderados não é  estática, ele tentará convencê‐los o tempo todo, arriscando‐se ora a ganhar, ora a  perder.  Ao  ganhar,  buscará  atrair  um  número  cada  vez  maior  de  pessoas,  grupos, movimentos e instituições para seu lado. Ao perder, terá de ver no que  se equivocou e, dentro de suas convicções, refazer, humildemente, o circuito do  convencimento que pode levar à vitória.  A  capacidade  de  simbolizar  e  transmitir  mensagens  é,  no  fundo,  idêntica  à  virtude  de  enxergar  e  propor  à  sociedade  um  caminho  que  seja  aceito  pelos  liderados,  ainda  que  momentaneamente.  Numa  sociedade  interativa,  esse  “projeto”  não  pode  ser  concebido  como  um  ato  de  razão  ou  de  vontade,  mas  como  uma  construção  coletiva  em  que  uns —  os  líderes —  expressam  melhor  e  simbolizam  em  dado  momento  o  movimento  da  sociedade,  o  qual  necessariamente  está  condicionado  por  valores,  por  modelos  culturais,  com  os  quais e sobre os quais se age. Ou o líder aponta e abre caminhos ou perde poder.  Mas o atributo pessoal crítico para o exercício da liderança, na nova como na  velha  política,  ainda  é  a  coragem.  Porque,  num  certo  momento,  será  indispensável  tomar  decisões  que  contrariam  muita  gente;  será  preciso,  até,  tomar decisões quase sozinho, por mais “persuadívelʺ que se seja. Líder é aquele  que, uma vez convencido do pleno acerto de uma decisão importante, só aceita  uma  atitude  de  si  mesmo:  tomar  essa  decisão.  Por  mais  difícil  que  seja,  ele  resolve  ir  em  frente  por  um  caminho,  ainda  que  contra  todos,  e  insiste  até  ganhar, porque vê lá na frente que é isso, e não outra coisa, que tem que fazer.  Max  Weber  tinha  desprezo  pelo  político  que  dá  de  ombros  para  as  conseqüências de seus atos, jogando a “culpa” na mesquinhez dos outros ou do  mundo,  resguardando‐se  em  sua  moral  íntima,  com  as  mãos  limpas.  Ao  contrário, respeitava o homem maduro (não importa se jovem ou velho) que, em 

Liderança política e reformas econômicas; a experiência brasileira no contexto da América Latina

67

  determinada circunstância, decide: “não posso fazer de outro modo” e assume a  respectiva  responsabilidade.  “Isso  é  algo  genuinamente  humano  e  comovente”,  ele diz. “Na medida em que isso é válido, uma ética de fins últimos e uma ética  de responsabilidade não são contrastes absolutos, mas antes suplementos, que só  em  uníssono  constituem  um  homem  genuíno —  um  homem  que  pode  ter  a  ‘vocação para a política’”.56  A  possibilidade  vislumbrada  por  Weber  de  conciliar  pragmatismo  com  valores  e  limites  éticos  que  transcendem  o  imediato  da  circunstância  é  encorajadora  para  o  governante  que  pergunte  a  si  mesmo,  como  nos  perguntamos muitas vezes, se conseguirá levar adiante as mudanças necessárias,  com a velocidade necessária, pelos caminhos sinuosos da democracia.  Fiquemos  com  Weber  para  terminar:  “A  política  é  como  a  perfuração  lenta  de  tábuas  duras.  Exige  tanto  paixão  como  perspectiva.  Certamente,  toda  a  experiência  histórica  confirma  a  verdade,  que  o  homem  não  teria  alcançado  o  possível se repetidas vezes não tivesse tentado o impossível. Para isso, o homem  deve  ser  um  líder,  e  não  somente  um  líder,  mas  também  um  herói,  no  sentido  muito  sóbrio  da  palavra.  E  mesmo  os  que  não  são  líderes  nem  heróis  devem  armar‐se com a fortaleza de coração que pode enfrentar até mesmo o desmoronar  de todas as esperanças.”  A  experiência  do  Brasil,  como  a  de  outros  países  importantes  da  América  Latina,  dá  razões  para  manter  viva  a  esperança  no  reformismo  democrático  e  renovar sua agenda política.       

                                                        Max Weber, “A política como vocação”, in Ensaios de Sociologia, Rio de Janeiro, Zahar, 1963, cap.  4, p. 151, tradução de Waltensir Dutra. 

56

68

Fernando Henrique Cardoso e Eduardo Graeff

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eco-Audit Environmental Benefits Statement   The  Commission  on  Growth  and  Development  is  committed  to  preserving  endangered  forests  and  natural  resources.  The  World  Bank’s  Office  of  the  Publisher  has  chosen  to  print  these  Working  Papers  on  100  percent  postconsumer  recycled  paper,  processed  chlorine  free,  in  accordance  with  the  recommended  standards  for  paper  usage  set  by  Green  Press  Initiative—a  nonprofit program supporting publishers in using fiber that is not sourced from  endangered forests. For more information, visit www.greenpressinitiative.org.    The printing of all the Working Papers in this Series on recycled paper saved the  following:    Trees* 

Solid Waste 

Water 

Net Greenhouse Gases 

Total Energy 

48 

2,247 

17,500 

4,216 

33 mil. 

*40 inches in  height and 6–8  inches in diameter 

Pounds 

Gallons 

Pounds CO2 Equivalent 

BTUs 

 

           

 

The Commission on Growth and Development Working Paper Series 29. The Automotive Industry in the Slovak Republic: Recent Developments and Impact on Growth, by Malgorzata Jakubiak and Peter Kolesar, June 2008 30. Crime and Growth in Colombia, by Mauricio Cardenas, June 2008 31. Chilean Growth Through East Asian Eyes, by Homi Kharas, Danny Leipziger, and R. Thillainathan, June 2008 32. Population Aging and Economic Growth, by David E. Bloom, David Canning, and Günther Fink, July 2008 33. Early Life Nutrition and Subsequent Education, Health, Wage, and Intergenerational Effects, by Jere R. Behrman, July 2008 34. International Finance and Growth in Developing Countries: What Have We Learned, by Maurice Obstfeld, August 2008 35. Policy and Institutional Dynamics of Sustained Development in Botswana, by Gervase Maipose, August 2008 36. Exports of Manufactures and Economic Growth: The Fallacy of Composition Revisited, by William R. Cline, August 2008 37. Integration with the Global Economy: The Case of Turkish Automobile and Consumer Electronics Industries, by Erol Taymaz and Kamil Yılmaz, August 2008 38. Political Leadership and Economic Reform: the Brazilian Experience, by Henrique Cardoso and Eduardo Graeff, September 2008

Forthcoming Papers in the Series: Philippines Case Study: The Political Economy of Reform during the Ramos Administration (1992–98), by Romeo Bernardo and Christine Tang (September 2008) Making Difficult Choices: Vietnam in Transition, Martin Rama, based on conversations with H. E. Võ Văn Kiệt, with Professor Đặng Phong and Đoàn Hồng Quang, November 2008

Electronic copies of the working papers in this series are available online at www.growthcommission.org. They can also be requested by sending an e-mail to [email protected]

Cover_WP038.indd 2

11/24/2008 4:12:42 PM

T

his paper deals with Brazil’s recent progress in consolidating democracy, controlling inflation, and resuming economic growth. Written by participants in the process, and from their perspective, the paper seeks to identify the importance and the limits of political leadership, highlighting the roles of the presidency, political parties, Congress, and media. References to the experience of Argentina, Chile, and Mexico help to contrast what is specifically Brazil, and less Latin America. 

E

ste paper relata os progressos recentes feitos pelo Brasil no sentido de consolidar a democracia, controlar a inflação e retomar o crescimento econômico. Com a objetividade possivel, levando em conta a participação dos autores nos acontecimentos, o relato busca reconhecer a importância e os limites da lideranca politica do país nesse processo, destacando os papéis do presidente da Republica, dos partidos politicos, do Congresso e dos meios de comunicação. Referências ocasionais à experiência dos vizinhos Argentina, Chile e México servem para realçar as peculiaridades do Brasil no contexto da América Latina. Fernando Henrique Cardoso, Former President of Brazil (1995–2002); currently president of the Instituto Fernando Henrique Cardoso (Sao Paulo, Brazil) Eduardo Graeff, Head of the State of Sao Paulo Liasion office in Brasilia

Commission on Growth and Development Montek Ahluwalia Edmar Bacha Dr. Boediono Lord John Browne Kemal Dervis¸ Alejandro Foxley Goh Chok Tong Han Duck-soo Danuta Hübner Carin Jämtin Pedro-Pablo Kuczynski Danny Leipziger, Vice Chair Trevor Manuel Mahmoud Mohieldin Ngozi N. Okonjo-Iweala Robert Rubin Robert Solow Michael Spence, Chair Sir K. Dwight Venner Ernesto Zedillo Zhou Xiaochuan

The mandate of the Commission on Growth and Development is to gather the best understanding there is about the policies and strategies that underlie rapid economic growth and poverty reduction. The Commission’s audience is the leaders of developing countries. The Commission is supported by the governments of Australia, Sweden, the Netherlands, and United Kingdom, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and The World Bank Group.

W O R K IN G PA P E R N O .38

Making Difficult Choices: Vietnam in Transition 

Những quyết sách khó khăn: Việt Nam trong giai đoạn chuyển đổi Fernando Henrique Cardoso Eduardo Graeff

Bilingual/Bilíngüe www.growthcommission.org [email protected]

Cover_WP038.indd 1

11/24/2008 4:11:42 PM

Loading...

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group

E ste paper relata os progressos recentes feitos pelo Brasil no sentido de consolidar a democracia, controlar a inflação e retomar o crescimento econ...

2MB Sizes 1 Downloads 0 Views

Recommend Documents

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
por parte del Banco, algún juicio sobre la condición jurídica de ninguno de los territorios, ni aprobación o acepta-

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
en el estatus nutricional. □ Una vez que el modelo está totalmente especificado, la etnicidad no aparece como ......

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
Finance Corporation, suas organizações afiliadas ou aos membros de sua Diretoria ou aos países que eles representam. A I

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
derecho. tecnologia y tnmsportes- pueden encontrarse en otras :fuentes. se han incluido aqui para &cilitar ]a ..... prod

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
universal, que hasta el momento, no han sido utilizados por ningún país de Regulatel. ...... de creación de política

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
Profesi Paling Baik di Dunia 311. Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 14. Media dan Akses Informasi di Thailand 319. Kavi Chongkitta

World Bank - Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
mercado e falta de conhecimento sobre a totalidade dos benefícios da pro- teção ambiental e conservação de recursos

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
iklim 69. 1.3 Umpan balik positif, titik balik, ambang batas, dan nonlinieritas dalam sistem-sistem alami dan sosioekono

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
tingkah laku sosial yang berhemah dan pembasmian kemiskinan, kerana ia secara langsung memberi kesan ke atas .... tingka

World Bank Documents & Reports - World Bank Group
Jan 22, 2001 - bantuan untuk mempersiapkan tenaga ahli di Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat. (DPR) dan Badan Pemeriksa Keuangan (B

รายการ หนูน้อยกู้อีจู้ | Josh Cruddas | Sasisa Jindamanee